Peer Accountability: A Strategy for Maintaining Commitment to Personal and Professional Obligations

By |Jan 10, 2020|Categories: Professional Development, Wellness|0 Comments

There are a number of personal attributes characterizing the professional identity of “physician.” We are dedicated to patients, committed to lifelong learning, and responsible for a variety of other professional obligations. Each requires physicians to be highly accountable – obligated or willing to accept responsibility for one’s actions. In this post we present examples of how we’ve adopted peer accountability as a strategy to help us with the myriad responsibilities and obligations at the heart of our profession. Just in time for the New Year – we challenge each of our readers to consider finding an “accountability partner” in 2020! [...]

Teaming Tips 10: Resuscitate Your Meetings | ALiEM Faculty Incubator

By |Dec 27, 2019|Categories: Incubators, Medical Education, Professional Development|0 Comments

Many of you are asked to take a leadership role in leading a team, whether it’s for research, administration, or even clinical. It is easy to feel unprepared for these roles, and there are many pitfalls waiting to sabotage your team’s productivity. The ALiEM Faculty Incubator has created a series of 10 case-based teaming problems to provide you with evidence-based advice and solutions for tackling some of the more common problems encountered in our professional team experiences. […]

TLDR Book Review: The Culture Code – The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups

By |Dec 20, 2019|Categories: Book Club, TLDR|Tags: |0 Comments

Have you had shifts or worked on committees where everything went smoothly? Closed loop communication happened, there was mutual respect among all the team members, and each individual felt empowered to give input even if it differed from what had already been said or done? You’ve probably also worked on shifts, in meetings, or participated in projects where it seemed like the team was falling apart, communicating on different wavelengths, and failing to have a shared understanding. You may feel like a great leader one day and a failure the next. The difference, according to The Culture Code, has everything [...]

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IDEA Series: Just-in-Time Training for Diagnostic Paracentesis

By |Dec 18, 2019|Categories: Academic, Gastrointestinal, IDEA series|0 Comments

According to the National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey, approximately 630,000 adults in the United States have cirrhosis of the liver, 69% of which are reportedly unaware of having liver disease. A diagnostic paracentesis is a simple procedure for identifying spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients with ascites. A just-in-time training (JITT) model incorporating low-fidelity equipment readily available in the ED can facilitate procedural teaching of the diagnostic paracentesis. […]

EM Match Advice: Deep Dive into the SLOE

By |Dec 6, 2019|Categories: EM Match Advice, Podcasts|0 Comments

A high-stakes component in a medical student’s application for an emergency medicine (EM) residency is the Standard Letter of Evaluation, or SLOE. This is a standardized templated letter, written by an group (e.g. department) or faculty from an EM-residency program. This episode of EM Match Advice gives a behind-the-scenes peek into what letter writers are thinking and a deeper dive into the mechanics of the SLOE. […]

Making Heads or Tails of the Flipped Classroom: Tips and Tricks for Students

By |Nov 29, 2019|Categories: Academic, Incubators, Medical Education|0 Comments

Now more than ever, medical educators are excited about the flipped classroom, defined by Bishop and Verleger as “a new pedagogical method, which employs asynchronous video lectures and practice problems as homework, and active, group-based problem-solving activities in the classroom” [1]. The premise is that students will learn basic concepts during self-study, at their own pace, and come to the classroom ready to dive into small groups and problem-based application [2]. This approach may be unfamiliar and you may find yourself asking:  Why should I care? and How do I get the most out of it? Let’s begin with the first [...]

Is Digital Attendance Enough?

By |Nov 22, 2019|Categories: Academic, Incubators, Medical Education, Social Media & Tech|0 Comments

Many medical schools have responded to student requests and begun to record and stream didactic lectures.  Students report watching these lectures can be more convenient and allow them to personalize the time, location, and speed to their specific needs. Meanwhile, faculty are freed up from giving the same Powerpoint lecture every semester and schools can highlight their “digital presence.” It seems to be a win on all sides, except when you look at the outcomes. […]

The Leader’s Library: Radical Candor | Curated Summary of the Discussion

By |Nov 18, 2019|Categories: Book Club, Leaders Library|0 Comments

Welcome back to The Leader’s Library! In our second installment, throughout the week of October 14, 2019, a group of selected learners across the globe tackled Radical Candor by Kim Scott [ALiEM book summary], and generated another fascinating asynchronous dialogue on Slack. This go-round, we had 3 days of discussion with days for reflection in between. Below are the main points that emerged from our robust conversation. […]

Just-in-Time Training for Emergency Medicine Radial Arterial Line Placement

By |Nov 15, 2019|Categories: Academic, Critical Care/ Resus, Medical Education|0 Comments

A 63-year-old male presents for acute onset of headache, neck pain, and altered mental status. He has a prior history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia but recently lost his insurance and has been unable to fill his medications. As a well-informed 2nd year resident, you suspect the presence of a ruptured subarachnoid hemorrhage and arrange an expedited trip to the CT scanner. The patient’s blood pressure continues to remain elevated and you initiate an antihypertensive drip. You decide that in order to have accurate titration, you need more reliable data and decide to place a radial arterial line. However, the last [...]

TLDR Book Review: Deep Work – Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World

By |Nov 8, 2019|Categories: Book Club, TLDR|0 Comments

Do you struggle when you try to focus on one task for a prolonged period? When you’re reading or writing a paper, are you frequently tempted by social media, a click-bait HuffPo article, or what the latest Instagram celebrities have been doing? Most of us are not used to spending large periods of time doing deep work. Like any skill, the ability to focus is something that we have to develop and train. This book, Deep Work, by Cal Newport will explain why it is so critical to develop our ability to focus deeply, and how to do it. [...]