12 12, 2016

PV Card: Elbow Injuries

elbow injuries

Elbow injuries are a common presentation to the Emergency Department. This pocket card reviews some the imaging, acute management, and some pearls for the following injuries: elbow dislocation, radial head subluxation, supracondylar fractures (such as the xray on the right), radial head fracture, epicondylitis, condyle fractures, and olecranon fracture. Thanks to Dr. Jonathon Hancock (Doctor’s Hospital orthopedist) for the expert peer review.

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21 11, 2016

PV Card: Knee Injuries | Quick Reference Guide

patella-dislocation knee injuriesOrthopedic injuries are commonly managed in the emergency department. Often a quick bedside reference card is needed to remind the clinician about the acute management decisions. This is the third of a series of orthopedic quick reference cards written by a team from the 2015-16 ALiEM Chief Resident Incubator. The first two were on ankle and hindfoot fractures and hip injuries. This card set covers knee injuries, specifically patella fractures, patella dislocation, and knee dislocation. These cards were expert reviewed by Dr. Scott Sherman, co-editor of the Emergency Orthopedics textbook (Amazon), and illustrations were created by Dr. Mary Haas.
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14 11, 2016

PV Card: Hip Injuries | Quick Reference Guide

hip-dislocation-posterior-drawing hip injuriesOrthopedic injuries are commonly managed in the emergency department. Often a quick bedside reference card is needed to remind the clinician about the acute management decisions. This is the second of a series of orthopedic quick reference cards written by a team from the 2015-16 ALiEM Chief Resident Incubator. The first was on ankle and hindfoot fractures, and this card set covers hip injuries, such as hip dislocations and femur fractures. These cards were expert reviewed by Dr. Scott Sherman, co-editor of the Emergency Orthopedics textbook (Amazon), and illustrations were created by Dr. Mary Haas.

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1 09, 2016

Trick of the Trade: Simple finger traps using gauze roll

Finger trapsClosed reduction of fractures or dislocations in the hand and wrist can be difficulty to achieve. Gravity can serve as an assistant. Commercial finger traps are available, but can sometimes be hard to find in the Emergency Department. An earlier trick of the trade describes the use of a gauze role to build your own finger trap setup. The following describes a simpler way to build finger traps using a gauze roll.

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25 07, 2016

Diagnosing the central slip injury

Extensor Tendon Laceration Finger 6 sm

Figure 1. Laceration overlying proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of right second digit. (Photograph by Daniel Ting and Jared Baylis)

A 34-year-old cabinet maker presents to your Emergency Department after accidentally getting his finger caught in a drawer. On examination, he has a superficial, clean laceration over the dorsal surface of the right second digit (Figure 1).

In a previous post, we discussed the approach to identifying, treating, and managing extensor tendon injuries of the hand. In it, we advocate for a high index of suspicion for extensor tendon injuries whenever a patient suffers a laceration to the dorsal aspect of the hand. However, lacerations over the PIP joint deserve special mention. In this article, we focus on the diagnosis of a specific type of extensor tendon laceration: the central slip injury.

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18 07, 2016

Extensor tendon injuries of the hand: Emergency Department management

hand laceration -225x300You are working in the treatment area with a medical student and she is ready to review a “straightforward” case with you. She presents a young, healthy 27-year-old man with a laceration over the dorsal surface of the left hand after a kitchen mishap. It appears clean, and she doesn’t suspect a foreign body. The neurovascular status seems okay with the intact ability to extend the fingers. Her plan is to repair the wound and send the patient for follow up in 7 to 10 days with his family physician for suture removal. The wound appears superficial, but you are an astute clinician and wonder if the skin laceration might not be the only injury. Is there an associated extensor tendon injury?

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1 07, 2016

AIR Series: Orthopedics Upper Extremity Module (2016)

Welcome to the Orthopedics Upper Extremity Module! After carefully reviewing all relevant posts from the top 50 sites of the Social Media Index the ALiEM AIR Team is proud to present the highest quality orthopedic upper extremity content. Below we have listed our selection of the 14 highest quality blog posts within the past 12 months (as of March 2016) related to orthopedic upper extremity emergencies, curated and approved for residency training by the AIR Series Board. More specifically in this module, we identified 2 AIRs and 12 Honorable Mentions. We recommend programs give 5 hours (just over 20 minutes per article) of III credit for this module.

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