11 01, 2017

IDEA Series: Teaching Residents Quality Improvement Through Action-Based Learning

The Problem

idea series teaching residents quality improvementWhile the ACGME has required EM residency curricula to incorporate quality improvement (QI), programs have faced the challenge of executing this in a meaningful way. How can EM residency programs effectively engage learners in an action-based curriculum for QI?
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27 11, 2016

IDEA Series: Partnering with Pathology to Review Deaths in the ED

The Problem

As part of their training, Emergency Medicine (EM) residents are required to perform patient follow up. However, there is currently no universal format in place. Additionally, there is often little follow-up information available on patients who die during the course of their Emergency Department (ED) visit, or shortly after admission to the hospital.

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24 10, 2016

IDEA Series: The “Knowledge Bomb” Highlights Clinically Relevant Research

The Problem

Residents continually face the challenge of keeping up to date with relevant medical literature in the midst of the rigors of completing medical residency. In addition, application of new medical knowledge obtained from reviewing recent research can be challenging and is a difficult skill to teach.

Residency provides a unique experience for individual learners based on each learner’s personal interests, interactions with other learners and faculty, and patient encounters. Often, residents achieve their best research and article discovery when prompted by specific patient encounters. A forum for individual residents to share knowledge gained from research prompted by these encounters is needed.

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9 09, 2016

IDEA Series: An Asynchronous Curriculum for the Resident as Teacher

The Problem

Idea Series LogoWhile residents may accumulate teaching tips and techniques during the course of their training by observing their mentors at work, learning how to educate while balancing the needs of a busy emergency department (ED) is a difficult skill to acquire. Unfortunately, excellent clinical skills do not always equate to effective teaching skills. With training, however, even the initially reluctant teacher can begin to effectively engage learners in the ED. An elective aimed toward developing the resident as a teacher allows residents to acquire and practice skills that will be particularly helpful for those that ultimately take on academic roles with teaching requirements.

As dedicated faculty time was in limited supply, our previous Resident As Teacher elective simply offered residents time to practice teaching with junior residents and medical students without offering significant structure or substance for those who wished to enhance their skillset as educators and acquire new knowledge.

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5 08, 2016

IDEA Series: Highlighting FOAM Content through an Asynchronous Course

The Problem

Idea Series LogoMany residents regularly consume FOAM (Free Open Access Medical Education) and online educational materials independently, without faculty guidance or input. At the same time, residency programs are looking for ways to provide high-quality asynchronous learning opportunities to their residents while remaining compliant with the Emergency Medicine Residency Review Committee (RRC-EM) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) guidelines.

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6 07, 2016

IDEA Series: Just-in-Time Procedural Training for Endotracheal Intubation

The Problem

Idea Series LogoProcedural training is critical in emergency medicine (EM). EM residents must effectively acquire the skills to safely and accurately perform high-stakes, invasive, and life-saving procedures during high-pressure scenarios. Residency programs typically incorporate procedural skills workshops into didactic sessions, which results in residents practicing procedures several weeks or months before performing them clinically. Unfortunately, there is no established method to practice and evaluate procedural skills competency immediately prior to performing invasive procedures on a patient. A solution to this issue may lead to improved outcomes and greater patient safety.

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1 06, 2016

IDEA Series: Team-Based Learning Activity – Fever in the Returning Traveler

The Problem

Idea Series LogoMost academic conferences are run as one-room school houses, with an audience that includes a wide variety of learners ranging from interns to highly experienced attending physicians. Engaging a group of 30 to 40 learners simultaneously can be difficult, especially when covering a particularly dense topic. Although this teaching environment presents unique challenges, it also provides an opportunity to pilot innovative techniques.

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