IDEA series: The Bleeding Arm Tourniquet Simulation

Tourniquet simulation

Education in emergency response to trauma is a global health priority [1]. Mortality rates are nearly twice as high in patients with trauma in low-income as compared to high-income countries [2]. With uncontrolled bleeding as the number one cause of death from trauma, tourniquet application has been the focus of training programs, like the “Stop the Bleed” campaign in the United States [3]. Although understanding how to apply a tourniquet is a life-saving intervention, use of a windlass tourniquet may not be intuitive [4].  The windlass tourniquet in its simplest form is the “stick-and-rope.” Winding the stick in the tourniquet creates a mechanical advantage for providing compression. Simulation of the windlass technique can be used to teach management of uncontrolled bleeding. Here we describe a low-cost simulation model that combines low- and high-fidelity techniques to train healthcare personnel on windlass tourniquet application.

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EM Bound: Newsletter for medical students interested in EM

EM BoundAre you a medical student, pursuing a career in Emergency Medicine (EM)? You are navigating your third and fourth years of medical school during an unprecedented time of the COVID-19 era. What if you can not get a visiting EM clerkship rotation? Are you automatically out of luck when it comes to residency applications? How do you keep apprised of timely, relevant information for residency application season? In an effort to support you and get ultra-prepared for the near future and EM internship, we are launching a monthly free email newsletter. Led by editor Dr. Sree Natesan (Assistant EM Residency Director, Duke University) and featuring an all-star, growing team of contributors, we announce the EM Bound newsletter.

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By |2020-04-20T19:31:27-07:00Apr 21, 2020|Medical Education, Medical Student|

Announcing a new curriculum for medical students: Bridge to EM

bridge to emergency medicine EM medical studentPrior to the COVID-19 pandemic, we were already planning to launch Bridge to Emergency Medicine (EM). This 8-week curriculum provides a structured learning schedule for senior medical students about to start an EM residency. For the sake of timeliness and at the request of clerkship directors, we are publishing our curriculum earlier than we planned. It currently is missing the assessment piece; however, once the quizzes are written and peer-reviewed, we will migrate Bridges to EM to ALiEMU. There, clerkship directors can monitor their students’ progress on the Educator Dashboard. Congratulations to the Bridge to EM Team, Drs. Tim Wetzel (co-lead), Christina Shenvi (co-lead), Sree Natesan, and Moises Gallegos.

By |2020-03-29T08:11:31-07:00Mar 28, 2020|Medical Education, Social Media & Tech|

Teaching in the age of COVID-19: The learning management system

learning management systemGiven the epidemiological data from China and Italy, educators should be prepared for the likelihood that online learning will continue to be the norm for many weeks to months. Simply running disconnected weekly educational sessions without an overall organization will hinder educational success for learners. Learning Management Systems (LMS) are a tool that can support educational leaders with the delivery, assessment, and organization of learning.

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Teaching in the age of COVID-19: Assessing learners remotely

 

COVID19 assessing learnersProviding content is great, but learner assessment is crucial in order to measure educational impact. Digital assessment is valid and reliable; it allows for multiple evaluations and gives learners the opportunity to actively participate in the educational process. Testing for most types of summative and formative evaluations can be done digitally. In this post, we describe the most suitable and reliable tools for assessing learners remotely.

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Teaching in the age of COVID-19: Enhancing discussion with digital asynchronous chats

 

asynchronousA significant portion of the technology industry is built around social media and asynchronous chat platforms that seek to connect people. Modern tools are designed with the intention to maximize engagement with push notifications, engagements, and emoji/like integrations that maximize the “dopamine rush” for users; “social media addiction” is a known phenomenon. These tools, when repurposed for learning, provide an easy and user-friendly platform for learners to discuss educational objectives. Chats are the quickest communication form, occurring in real-time and encouraging spontaneity and adaptation. There is a sense of forgiveness, and oftentimes if the chat is anonymous, a high degree of confidence for participation among learners. Use of a moderator is a KEY factor in keeping the discussion professional (and alive!) [1].

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