Paucis Verbis card: NIH Stroke Scale

StrokePatients present with acute strokes to the Emergency Department. Time is of the essence to obtain a rapid neurologic exam, draw labs, get CT imaging, and consulting a neurologist especially if the patient presents within 3 hours of onset. To help the neurologist determine whether the patient should get thrombolytics, calculating a NIH Stroke Scale score is useful.w

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2019-01-28T23:48:10-07:00

Hot off the press: Free EM Practice articles

EBMedicineThanks to EB Medicine, “Emergency Medicine Practice” articles from 2007 and earlier are now free! This series is a well-written and practical evidence-based review resource for EM physicians. It’s a great place to start reading about bread-and-butter EM content, especially for medical students and junior residents. There haven’t been too much change in the past 3 years on many of the topics.

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2016-11-11T19:01:34-07:00

Trick of the trade: Spicing up your evidence-based lecture

JournalClubsmBefore I start creating a new talk, I ask myself 3 questions:

  1. Who will be in the audience?
  2. How can I make my talk more worthwhile to audience members, beyond their just reading the material/handout/articles on their own?
  3. Am I giving a talk before or after Dr. Amal Mattu? If so, just be resigned to being second-best.

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2019-02-19T18:55:41-07:00

iPhone uses in the Emergency Department

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Occasionally, I get a rare – “Hey congrats on the article!” comment from residents or students. It’s usually in reference to my ACEP News column that comes out every 3 months on Tricks of the Trade. However, I got about 3 shout-outs in the past 2 days. How odd.

Then I saw one of our office staff who was reading EM News. “Hey cool!” she said. Totally confused, I realized that I was quoted on the front page of this week’s publication about iPhone applications in EM. Many months ago, I had done a brief telephone interview with the writer.

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2016-11-11T19:01:35-07:00

Trick of the Trade: My new penlight

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On any given day in the ED, I use my super-bright penlight 2-5 times a day. It is amazing what things I’ve almost missed without a bright LED flashlight.

  • Subtle HSV-2 labial ulcerations in a female patient with dysuria
  • Additional scalp lacerations hidden in the hair
  • Tonsillar exudates in a patient with strep pharyngitis
  • Unequal pupillary responses in a brightly lit trauma room in a head-injured patient

I wanted to revisit a prior post about the importance of changing your Tungsten penlight to a LED light.

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2019-01-28T23:47:58-07:00