About Daniel Ting, MD

National medical education editor, CanadiEM
Emergency Medicine Resident
University of British Columbia

Diagnosing the central slip injury

Extensor Tendon Laceration Finger 6 sm

Figure 1. Laceration overlying proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of right second digit. (Photograph by Daniel Ting and Jared Baylis)

A 34-year-old cabinet maker presents to your Emergency Department after accidentally getting his finger caught in a drawer. On examination, he has a superficial, clean laceration over the dorsal surface of the right second digit (Figure 1).

In a previous post, we discussed the approach to identifying, treating, and managing extensor tendon injuries of the hand. In it, we advocate for a high index of suspicion for extensor tendon injuries whenever a patient suffers a laceration to the dorsal aspect of the hand. However, lacerations over the PIP joint deserve special mention. In this article, we focus on the diagnosis of a specific type of extensor tendon laceration: the central slip injury.

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2017-03-11T00:19:16-07:00

Extensor tendon injuries of the hand: Emergency Department management

hand laceration -225x300You are working in the treatment area with a medical student and she is ready to review a “straightforward” case with you. She presents a young, healthy 27-year-old man with a laceration over the dorsal surface of the left hand after a kitchen mishap. It appears clean, and she doesn’t suspect a foreign body. The neurovascular status seems okay with the intact ability to extend the fingers. Her plan is to repair the wound and send the patient for follow up in 7 to 10 days with his family physician for suture removal. The wound appears superficial, but you are an astute clinician and wonder if the skin laceration might not be the only injury. Is there an associated extensor tendon injury?

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