Podcasts on the ALiEM Soundcloud account

EM Match Advice 37: EM Program Directors Reflect on the 2022 Match

EM Match Advice 10 year table residency match

In this 37th episode of EM Match Advice, we discuss the results of the 2021-22 EM Residency Match with lots of shocking numbers and surprises to review. The table above lists the trends and data since 2014, extracted from the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) site [1]. Could this have been foreseen? What does this mean for the 2022-23 EM Match season? In this podcast, Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin host the following esteemed panel of 3 program directors to review this juicy table and discuss the future:

  • Dr. Abra Fant (Northwestern University)
  • Dr. Sara Krzyzaniak (Stanford University)
  • Dr. Bonnie Kaplan (Denver Health)

More Numbers from ERAS/AAMC by Program

emergency medicine EM Match Advice ERAS table

EM Match Advice Podcast

 

Read and Listen to the Other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

 

References and Additional Reading

  1. National Residency Match Program: Data and Reports
  2. Pelletier-Bui AE, Schnapp BH, Smith LG, et al. Making Our Preference Known: Preference Signaling in the Emergency Medicine Residency Application. West J Emerg Med. 2021;23(1):72-75. Published 2021 Dec 17. doi:10.5811/westjem.2021.10.53996. PMID 35060866
  3. Preference/Program Signaling (PS) in Emergency Medicine. CORD website, 2022.
By |2022-05-28T09:30:51-07:00May 11, 2022|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

The Leader’s Library: New Rules of Work | Sign up to join the book club

new rules of work leader's library

“…picture a map with point A, which is where you are now, and point Z, which is where you retire after a long career. Twenty years ago, there might have been a reasonably finite number of straight lines connecting those two points. Now it’s like a UV light has been turned on, illuminating dozens of previously hidden interconnected pathways that branch and diverge in many directions. And within this maze are any number of paths that may prove deeply fulfilling for you.”

“New normal.”

How many times have we heard that phrase over the past year? Thankfully, the first specks of the “new normal” pundits have been hawking at us since the start of the pandemic have finally begun to materialize, and along with this new normal comes a set of New Rules.

Podcast Preview

Brief Summary

The New Rules of Work: The Muse Playbook for Navigating the Modern Workplace by Alexandra Cavoulacos and Kathryn Minshew was published in 2019, but couldn’t feel more timely. This book targets all professionals, whether those of you just starting out in your careers, midway through and hoping to shake things up, or in the latter years of emergency medicine practice and hunting for a new role. The authors write, “whatever your current obstacle is, you can face it. The only thing you shouldn’t be doing if you’re feeling stuck or disillusioned or stressed out is nothing. There are always next steps to take, new strategies to try, and new skills to build.”

Stuck? Yes.

Disillusioned? Maybe.

Stressed out? YES.

Cavoulacos and Minshew describe one’s career as “a lifelong process of honing skills, developing self-awareness, and understanding what really makes you tick– and how you can best apply all of that to your work,” and we couldn’t agree more. Rather than a cut-and-dry definition of what a career in emergency medicine looks like (ex. decades of working X number of 8-hour shifts a month, teaching some learners, and doing your administrative work), instead we face a perpetual journey of examination, semi-intentional detours, and self-challenge. In The New Rules, the authors guide the reader through several stages of a career pivot, starting with self-reflection on current values and mindset. They then provide concrete strategies for building one’s brand, networking, interviewing, and negotiating, and round things out with several suggestions for improving efficiency and effectiveness in the workplace. Some favorites:

  • Under the Old Rules, one made their career decision in young adulthood, stuck to it, and followed a preordained path to an inevitable conclusion. The New Rules reframe that to focus on the next 2-5 years: “…this isn’t about finding the perfect career forevermore– it’s about finding a job that’s the best fit for you right now.” The last 2 years have taught us that nothing is certain in the future, so why center decades from now in our decision-making, rather than the present?
  • Networking under the Old Rules felt like a disingenuous, awkward activity focused on shameless self-promotion, and I avoided it like someone coughing maskless on the bus. The New Rules, however, encourage us to “look at networking as building relationships that grow over time, rather than a business transaction where you need something” to allow its value to multiply. That I can do (and the authors even offer a list of “Seven Ways to Fit Networking into Your Really Busy Schedule”– a really busy thank you!).
  • Although the Old Rules sold interpersonal skills as personality traits inherent to the individual, something you either had or ya didn’t, the New Rules emphasize personal responsibility for professional development, urging readers to intentionally approach “refining your interpersonal skills, which includes both building strong relationships with your colleagues and learning how to manage up early in and throughout your career.” Cavoulacos and Minshew do a deep dive into effective strategies for this managing up, as well as running meetings, corresponding over email, public speaking, conflict resolution, and even delegation and mentorship.

Lots to cover in one lil’ volume, but The Leader’s Library is here to help! Whether you’re a C-suite executive hoping to close out your career with a new role in education, a student hoping to meld multiple passions into your future emergency medicine career, or a mid-career faculty member wondering where your post-Covid professional journey may take you, our next discussion is for you! Grab the book and join a diverse group of emergency medicine faculty whose widely varied career paths will converge on the discussion from April 18-20 on Slack. Everyone is welcome. Sign up now!

When: April 18-20, 2022*
Platform: Slack app
Size: 40 registrants

* The Leader’s Library runs asynchronously on the Slack app– jump in whenever you have time!

Signup Process

Deadline to sign up: March 30, 2022

  • Submit your interest form with your contact information.
  • We will inform you if you’re selected by April 1, 2022.

We would absolutely love to learn and grow with you! Sign up now to secure your spot!

SIGN UP

Team

  • Al’ai Alvarez, MD: Director of Well-Being at Stanford Emergency Medicine (@alvarezzzy)
  • Felix Ankel, MD: Emergency Physician, Regions Hospital. Medical Director, Education, HealthPartners Institute, Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School (@felixankel)
  • Winnie Chan, MD: Associate Physician Eden Emergency Medical Group, Per Diem Physician at San Francisco General Hospital and Kaiser Permanente Redwood City (@chanEMdoc)
  • Nikita Joshi, MD: Medical director of Alameda Hospital Emergency Department, Chief of Staff Alameda Hospital (@njoshi8)
  • Sreeja Natesan, MD: Associate Program Director, Duke University (@sreeja_natesan)
  • Deepa Ravikumar, MD: Senior Medical Director, Ro, Healthcare Technology Company; Clinical Instructor, Mount Sinai Hospital Emergency Department
  • Dina Wallin, MD: Co-Medical Director of PEM, San Francisco General Hospital; Director of Didactics, UCSF-SFGH EM residency, San Francisco, California

 

Learn more about the other Leader’s Library book clubs.

Listen to all of The Leader’s Library podcasts

By |2022-03-14T19:32:27-07:00Mar 15, 2022|Book Club, Leaders Library, Podcasts|

EM Match Advice 36: It’s Time to Make Your Rank List

Now that interview season for residency match has concluded, our residency director panel tackles the hot topic of making your rank list, which includes “love letters” to programs and second look visits. In this podcast, Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin host an esteemed panel of 3 program directors, Dr. Emily Fisher (University of Oklahoma), Dr. William Paolo (SUNY Upstate), and Dr. Michael Van Meter (University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) to discuss these issues. Good luck to everyone in the match this year!

EM Match Advice Podcast

Read and Listen to the Other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

By |2022-04-26T16:24:10-07:00Feb 9, 2022|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

EM Match Advice: Where did all the jobs go, and did the applicants follow?

In this episode of EM Match Advice, our panel takes on the tough issues of 2021. Specifically we discuss the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Workforce Study [1] that projects fewer jobs for emergency physicians and the hot-off-the-press ERAS data showing a drop in the number of EM residency applicants, compared to 2 years ago. Did one cause the other? In this podcast, Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin host an esteemed panel of 3 program directors, Dr. Cassandra Bradby (East Carolina University), Dr. Adam Kellogg (Baystate Health), and Dr. Craig Krausz (Saint Louis University).

The Numbers

  • The ACEP Workforce Study projects a whopping 7,845 excess of emergency physicians in 2030 who could be left without jobs. And our very smart medical students have been eyeing those numbers carefully.
  • While EM is still an attractive specialty for many medical students, some enter this year’s residency application season with a trepidation that hasn’t been seen before. And a good deal of  students clearly chose a specialty other than EM, with approximately 200 fewer applicants projected this cycle, compared to 2 years ago. Most of that drop came from students at LCME-accredited medical schools. [Silver lining: These numbers may make for a buyer’s market that greatly favors the students in the upcoming Match.]
  • Below is a summary of the ERAS data, pulled from their downloadable Excel data. Note that these data were collected on October 3 of each year and only summarize data from EM-only residencies (not EM/IM or EM/FM).
Characteristic2016-172017-182018-192019-202020-21*2021-22
Number of EM residency applicants3,2203,3303,3383,601x3,408
Average number of submitted applications in EM49.153.3557.8659.75x61.23
Average of applications received per EM program883.3866.6850.82874.58x772.82
AAMC’s ERAS data for 2016-2022 for the specialty of Emergency Medicine, collected on October 3 of each year
(* Because of the pandemic, the 2020-21 season’s timeline was shifted later by about 1 month, resulting in non-comparable data.)

EM Match Advice Podcast

Additional Resources

Read and Listen to the other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

References

  1. Marco CA, Courtney DM, Ling LJ, et al. The Emergency Medicine Physician Workforce: Projections for 2030 [published online ahead of print, 2021 Aug 2]. Ann Emerg Med. 2021; doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2021.05.029. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34353653.
By |2021-10-27T09:50:17-07:00Oct 30, 2021|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

EM Match Advice: Program Directors Reflect on the 2021 Residency Match

How competitive is EM emergency medicine match EM Match Advice

Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin return for their annual review of the most recent Match in emergency medicine (EM) in latest episode of EM Match Advice. They were joined by a panel of 3 outstanding program directors, Dr. Jacob Ufberg (Temple), Dr. Amita Sudhir (University of Virgina), and Dr. William Caputo (Staten Island Medical Center). Was the EM Match more competitive this year? That’s a complicated question and you need to listen to the podcast discussion for the nuanced answer.

The Slide: The Nitty Gritty Annual Numbers of the EM Match

“The Slide” above is a summary of EM Match statistics taken from the annual National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) Data and Results publication over the last 10 years. Trends suggest that EM is becoming less competitive year over year; however, 2021 saw the greatest number of unmatched medical students who were EM bound. What are the most competitive specialties and how does EM compare? Generally, we use the % fill rate with LCME students to determine the competitiveness of a specialty. That is the % of entry-level positions filled by allopathic senior medical students from the US, Puerto Rico, and Canada. Who’s on top this year? Four combined programs that each have very few PGY-1 positions in the match all filled with 100% LCME students: EM-anesthesiology, medicine-anesthesiology, pediatrics-anesthesiology, and pediatrics-PMR. Here’s how a few of the other specialties fared:

  • Thoracic surgery 93.5%
  • Plastic surgery 89.3%
  • Vascular surgery 82.3%
  • Orthopedic surgery 80.5%
  • Obstetrics-gynecology 66.7%
  • Surgery 65.6%
  • Emergency medicine 62.1%
  • Pediatrics 60.3%
  • Radiology 58.2%
  • Internal medicine 39%

Podcast: Program Directors Reflecting on the 2021 EM Residency Match

Read and Listen to the other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

By |2021-07-19T19:27:46-07:00Jul 21, 2021|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

Education Theory Made Practical: Listen to the New Podcast Series

education theory made practical books into podcast

The Education Theory Made Practical (ETMP) set of 3 e-books were published starting 2017, reviewing key education theory principles and practically framing the abstract into practical scenarios. This series was produced by the ALiEM Faculty Incubator in collaboration with the  International Clinician Educator (ICE) blog. These e-books can be downloaded for free in the ALiEM Library.

We were surprised, humbled, and honored that Dr. Daniel Harper wanted to convert the popular e-books into a podcast series, with each chapter turned into short 10-20 minute podcast. As a pilot test, he converted Volume 1 into a set of 10 podcasts. Take a listen, put on your educator-scholar caps, and let us know what you think.

Podcast Series: Education Theory Made Practical (Volume 1)


Podcast Team

Daniel Harper

Host: Daniel Harper, MD

Senior Resident
Dual Interventional Radiology and Diagnostic Radiology
Ochsner LSU Health Shreveport

Host: Surbhi Raichandani, MD

Senior Resident
Department of Radiology
University of Arkansas Medical Sciences

Guest Voice:

  • Loren James Perley (electrical engineer)

Reference

Chan TC, Gottlieb M, Sherbino J, Boysen-Osborn M, Papanagnou D, Yarris L. Education Theory Made Practical, Volume 1. San Francisco, CA: ALiEM Publishing, 2017. [ISBN 978-0-9992825-0-2, PDF]

By |2021-07-20T06:21:16-07:00Jul 16, 2021|Academic, Medical Education, Podcasts|

EM Match Advice: 2020-21 Interview Season | This is how it started, this is how it’s going

EM Match Advice residency interview season 2020-21

The 2020-21 residency interview season has required rapid innovation and adaptability for both medical student applicants and residency programs, given COVID-19’s physical distancing restrictions. Listen to how it started and how it is going thus far with podcast co-hosts Dr. Michael Gisondi (Stanford) and Dr. Michelle Lin (UCSF).

Podcast episode with 2020-21 mid-season update and insights


Program director panelists

  • Dr. Camiron Pfennig – Prisma Health University of South Carolina Greenville
  • Dr. Ryan Bodkin – University of Rochester
  • Dr. Michael Kiemeney – Loma Linda University

Listen to all the episodes of the EM Match Advice Series

Additional resources

By |2021-07-01T10:16:37-07:00Jan 15, 2021|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|
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