This Book Club series led by Dr. Nikita Joshi (@NJoshi8) and Dr. Jordana Haber (@JoJoHaber), introduces you to books that are pertinent to medical practice and the culture of medical education. Discussion will be held every other month. The goal is to share books, both nonfiction and fiction, medical and not, that can deepen our clinical practice and commitment to delivering great medical education to learners. Whether you are a physician, nurse, paramedic, or allied health care provider, we would love for you to join in on the discussion on this blog.

ALiEM Book Club: Beyond the ED Series

The ALiEM Book Club’s Beyond the ED Series headed by Dr. Taku Taira (@TakuTaira) is meant to be a way to share books that leaders within the medical community love and treasure without having the usual bookclub discussion associated with it. These books are sure to challenge and enrich the reader.

Suggestions

There are so many great books out there and not enough time to get to them. Please let us know if you come across any book that you feel would be worthwhile reading as a part of our book club!

Previous books

DateBookAuthorBook Discussion and Commentary
January 2020Forget a Mentor, Find a SponsorSylvia Ann HewlettBlog Link
December 2016Show and Tell: How Everybody Can Make Extraordinary PresentationsDan RoamBlog Link
November 20, 2016Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us AllDavid and Tom KelleyBlog Link
October 16, 2016On the Move: A LifeOliver SacksBlog Link
August 14, 2016A Thousand Naked Strangers: A Paramedic’s Wild Ride to the Edge and BackKevin HazzardBlog Link
June 10, 2016The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer AgeRobert WachterBlog Link
May 13, 2016Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to LeadSheryl SandbergBlog Link
April 8, 2016When Breath Becomes AirPaul KalanithiBlog Link
March 12, 2016Steal Like An ArtistAustin KleonBlog Link
February 12, 2016Bouncebacks! Emergency Department Cases: ED ReturnsMichael B. Weinstock, Ryan Longstreth, Gregory L. HenryBlog Link
January 15, 2016Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster
Svetlana AlexievichBlog Link
January 8, 2016A Few Short Notes on Tropical Butterflies: StoriesJohn MurrayBlog Link
November 17, 2015Let Me Heal: The Opportunity to Preserve Excellence in American Medicine
Kenneth LudmererBlog Link
October 9, 2015Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic
Sam QuinonesBlog Link
August 14, 2015The White Coat Investor: A Doctor’s Guide To Personal Finance And Investing
James M. DahleBlog Link
July 10, 2015The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of ColorblindnessMichelle AlexanderBlog Link
June 12, 2015How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical ThinkingJordan EllenbergBlog Link
May 8, 2015We Need to Talk About KevinLionel ShriverBlog Link
April 10, 2015The Art of ChoosingSheena IyengarBlog Link
March 21, 2015Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the EndAtul GawandeBlog Link
February 13, 2015The Emperor of all MaladiesSiddhartha MukherjeeBlog Link
January 16, 2015Brain on Fire: My Month of MadnessSusannah CahalanBlog Link
December 12, 2014Risk Savvy: How to Make Good DecisionsGerd GigerenzerBlog Link
November 21, 2014Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of TellingEdgar ScheinBlog Link
October 10, 2014When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary TestsLeana Wen and Joshua KosowskyBlog Link
September 19, 2014A History of Present Illness: StoriesLouise AronsonBlog Link
July 11, 2014David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling GiantsMalcolm GladwellBlog Link
May 12, 2014How We DieSherwin NulandBlog Link
March 14, 2014What Doctors FeelDanielle OfriBlog Link
February 14, 2014DriveDaniel PinkBlog Link
January 10, 2014One Room School HouseSalman KhanBlog Link
December 13, 2013Five Days at MemorialSheri FinkBlog Link
Google Hangout on Air
November 8, 2013Interpreter of Maladies – A short story “Temporary Matter”
Jhumpa LahiriBlog Link
Podcast Wrap Up
October 11, 2013The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at WorkShawn AchorBlog Link
Google Hangout on Air video
September 13, 2012House of GodSamuel ShemBlog Link
August 9, 2013The Checklist ManifestoAtul GawandeBlog Link
Curated Commentary
July 19, 2013Difficult Conversations
D Stone, B Patton, S HeenBlog Link
June 28, 2013The Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksRebecca SklootBlog Link

Past Book Club Leadership

Dr. Teresa Chan (@TChanMD)
Dr. Brent Thoma (@Brent_Thoma)

* Disclaimer: We have no affiliations financial or otherwise with the authors, the books, hyperlinks, videos or Amazon.

Defying Forgettable Flatness: The Power of Moments | Summary of The Leader’s Library Discussion

The Power of Moment book for the Leader's Library

In September, ALiEM hosted its fourth iteration of The Leader’s Library, this time discussing The Power of Moments by Chip Heath and Dan Heath [Amazon link to book]. Driven by a purpose “to defy the forgettable flatness of everyday work and life by creating a few precious moments,” 30 participants and 6 facilitators embarked on a 3-day voyage through the book, exploring general themes of CREATE (how do we manipulate our surroundings to create powerful moments?), REFLECT (how have powerful moments influenced our personal and professional lives?), and CAPITALIZE (how can we utilize moments to effect change and progress?). The interprofessional group of participants hailed from 6 countries, representing all levels of training, with local, regional, state, national, and international leadership experience. Lots of lived moments to contemplate!

The authors explain that for a moment to jump out at us and really stick, influencing our outlook and changing our behavior (a “defining moment”), the moment must:

  • Elevate us: pull us up from the mundane into something special (ex. a colleague brings you a fancy latte on shift to celebrate your birthday), and/or
  • Deepen our insight: change our understanding of the world (ex. hearing a speaker who completely reframes the way we’d always viewed a topic), and/or
  • Instill pride: help us see ourselves and others at our best, and be proud of this (ex. public recognition at faculty meeting for a job well done), and/or
  • Create connection: link us with others (ex. current residents, faculty, and alumni celebrating together at residency graduation)

Once we understand these critical components of defining moments, we can then engineer our environments to create these moments intentionally. Whether a person is a community provider seeking to spice up their on-shift work, or a residency program director hunting for ways to boost morale in a tough year, or the director of a regional disaster response during a pandemic– all of us in emergency medicine could use some extra powerful moments in our lives.

Day 1: Create

The first day of The Leader’s Library started with participants describing particularly memorable moments in their lives. Inevitably, the conversation shifted to the concepts of time and timing, and a nuanced discussion ensued around our relationship with the two (how is a minute different from a moment?). In the Greek language there are two words for time: chronos and kairos. Most of our professional energy is spent focusing on time (chronos), while most meaningful moments are more significantly influenced by timing (kairos); participants discussed how we can shift our worlds more toward kairos to maximize great moments. (For example, selecting a kairos time to deliver important feedback might create a defining moment for the recipient, while a feedback session centered around chronos is just another meeting.) 

We then contemplated how mindset can affect moments, and whether people with a growth mindset inherently experience moments differently than ones with a fixed mindset (participants felt that they do– a growth mindset allows an individual to recognize a low point or “pit” as a valuable learning opportunity, a powerful moment, while a fixed mindset might only perceive an obstacle). 

We then discussed transition. Acknowledging that many memorable moments happen during times of transition (birthdays, graduations, weddings, funerals), how can we as leaders and educators choreograph inevitable transitions (such as the start of a new rotation, or the beginning of a new postgraduate year of training) to maximize and enhance the experience for our learners? Participants shared a wealth of great ideas, such as a resident receiving the “golden laryngoscope” trophy once they’ve signed off on intubations, bringing a cake to a trainee’s last shift of residency and sending a picture of them cutting it to their family, and welcoming a resident who’s been lost in off-service land with a cup of coffee and a granola bar on their first shift back in the ED. 

Lastly, we explored how we can maximize moments in non-transitions. The authors write that “breaking the script” can help elevate an everyday experience into a powerful moment, and ideas our readers had included holding small meetings outside, taking a walk with a mentee instead of sitting in an office, and giving kudos spontaneously when it’s earned, rather than storing it up for a semi-annual evaluation.

Day 2: Reflect

On day 2, we turned inward to reflect on defining moments, both positive and negative, that we’d experienced over the course of our lives and careers. One participant applied the chicken-egg paradox to moments, and wondered if moments are external stimuli that happen to us and shape the stories we tell ourselves to make sense of the universe around us, or if moments are only perceived and noticed after an internal reflection process– do moments shape our stories, or do our stories shape our moments? The consensus was a resounding YES (to both). 

We explored the authors’ proposed formula for leaders seeking to stretch their team members into growth– many participants work with learners of all stages, and easily applied these managerial concepts to medical education. The Heaths argue that (high standards + assurance) + (direction + support) = enhanced self insight, or personal growth. How might this look in medicine? A faculty member working on a manuscript with a trainee might say, “I wrote several revision suggestions. I expect high-quality writing out of you, and know you can achieve it. I pulled some examples of outstanding scientific writing for you. We’ll meet again next week, and I’m available by e-mail in the interim.” This sure has a different impact than simply sending the trainee a document full of markup and critiques! By applying this formula and thinking in moments, we shifted this encounter from discouraging to motivating, from banal to defining, all with an extra 1-2 minutes of effort.

Early career participants reflected that this might be easier in theory than in practice; one participant stated, “The knife’s edge balance of being shamed vs having high expectations placed on us, then living up to them, is crazy!” A mid-career participant sagely counseled, “As I’ve continued to have fascinating professional opportunities, I find that less surprises me and fewer things wound me. Cultivating equanimity… and caring about life, but with a certain indifference to the details, helps transform a wider array of experiences into growth opportunities rather than moments of hurt.” Yet again we returned to the premise of thinking in moments facilitating continual professional development and evolution.

We closed day two with a discussion of purpose vs passion. Although “passion” seems like an exotic way to fuel one’s career, the authors maintain that “purpose trumps passion:”

Passion is individualistic. It can energize us, but also isolate us, because my passion isn’t yours. By contrast, purpose is something people can share. It can knit groups together.

Successful leaders can cultivate a shared purpose in their organization, so everyone (passionately) fulfills their roles to the best of their ability toward this common purpose– from respiratory therapists to attending physicians to child life specialists, each team member is united in this purpose. And how do we unearth such purpose? By asking a series of “whys.” The authors use a great example from healthcare, querying a hospital custodian:

  • Why do you clean hospital rooms? “Because that’s what my boss tells me to do.”
  • Why? “Because it keeps the rooms from getting dirty.”
  • Why does that matter? “Because it makes the rooms more sanitary and more pleasant.”
  • Why does that matter? “Because it keeps the patients healthy and happy.”

Narrowing the scope from organizational to individual, one participant mused that this exercise could have incredible value as one contemplates one’s own career, or scaffolds a mentee as they generate a 5 year plan, although “it almost seems invasive, like if I did it in a residency interview it would be too much… but not too much for me alone with a piece of paper, and maybe not too much for a conversation with a learner struggling to find their purpose, if it felt safe for them to look that deep.”

Day 3: Capitalize

Discussion on day 3 focused on actions we can take to make the most of the moments, both big and small, that we experience and create throughout our careers. We discussed several ways of highlighting little moments we experience every day. Some participants plan to ask themselves and their learners after a shift about what they learned and who they learned from to highlight and celebrate that learning and teaching, and to cultivate a gratitude practice. Monthly didactics can be reframed from a residency requirement to an opportunity to create positive moments for learners– a chance to celebrate milestones and forge connection. Participants reflected that sharing one’s own journey and personal defining moments can spark new powerful moments for others. One person shared a cool practice: “I am pretty old school and prefer to read paper books. I have a habit when I finish reading a book, I write my major learning points inside the cover, and then I think of someone to give the book to, or sometimes mail to. Eventually this process is repeated, and that inside cover is chock-full of amazing ways the book has inspired people.” Mind blown.

The Power of Moments: Take home quotes from our discussion

Several discussants plan to do something similar; we’ll close this post with some major messages they would write inside the cover of this book. Thanks to our outstanding facilitators, engaged participants, and you, the ALiEM community, for constantly pushing your leaders to grow. Hope to grow with you at The Leader’s Library, V5 in the spring!

“I’d write the table of contents… It really sums up so many of the key points of the book and in very few words.” – Table of contents: Defining Moments. Thinking in Moments. Build Peaks. Break the Script. Trip Over the Truth. Stretch for Insight. Recognize Others. Multiply Milestones. Practice Courage. Create Shared Meaning. Deepen Ties. Making Moments Matter.

“Small moments can have great impact as defining moments. Commemorate milestones, no matter how small.”

“We remember our lives as a series of moments, good or bad, large or small. While many moments happen organically, some can be created, engineered, or encouraged. Remember your moments and learn from them. Encourage positive moments for those around you.”

“Pause. Soak up the present. You could be missing out on a moment that could impact you or someone around you. Try to make it a better moment.”

And, a final quote from she who started it all, Dr. Michelle Lin: “Moments matter. Pass it on.”

By |2020-12-15T09:24:17-08:00Dec 23, 2020|Book Club, Leaders Library|

Education Theory Made Practical (Volume 3): An ALiEM Faculty Incubator eBook Project

The ALiEM Team is delighted to announce another eBook publication: the third volume in the Education Theory Made Practical series. This book was a labor of love written by the 2018-19 Faculty Incubator class. We are very proud of all our Faculty Incubator alumni who made this happen. Their hard work has been compiled in this FREE, peer-reviewed eBook. We sincerely feel that it will be useful for all the educators out there, wrestling with the issue of integrating theory into practice. Special shout-out to the incredible Dr. David Sklar (former Editor-in-Chief of Academic Medicine) for providing us a thought-provoking foreword.

 

Download or View the Book Now

The book is available in 2 formats:

iBook format via the iTunes bookstore 

PDF format via ResearchGate

 

About the Book 

The Education Theory Made Practical series aims to make the theoretical underpinnings of education psychology come alive for health professions teachers, who are seeking to use theory to inform their clinical and classroom teaching.

 

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Six Steps Model of Curriculum Development

Chris Lloyd, DO; Simiao Li-Sauerwine, MD, MS; Shannon McNamara, MD

 

Chapter 2: The Kirkpatrick Model

Christoper Fowler, DO; Lisa Hoffman, DO; Shreya Trivedi, MD; Amanda Young, MD

 

Chapter 3: Realist Evaluation

Jason An, MD; Christine Stehman, MD; Randy Sorge, MD

 

Chapter 4: Mastery Learning

Michael Barrie, MD; Shawn Dowling, MD, FRCPC; Nicole Rocca, MD, FRCPC

 

Chapter 5: Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning

Laurie Mazurik, MD; Elissa Moore, DO; Megan Stobart-Gallagher, DO; Quinn Wicks, MD

 

Chapter 6: Validity

Rebecca Shaw, MBBS; Carly Silvester, MBBS

 

Chapter 7: Programmatic Assessment

Elizabeth Dubey, MD; Christian Jones, MD; Annahieta Kalantari, DO

 

Chapter 8: Self-Assessment Seeking

Nilantha Lenora, MD; Layla Abubshait, MD; Manu Ayyan, MBBS

 

Chapter 9: Bolman and Deal Four-Frame Model

Lexie Mannix, MD; Shawn Mondoux, MD; David Story, MD

 

Chapter 10: Kotter’s Stages of Change

Dallas Holladay, DO; Melissa Parsons, MD; Gannon Sungar, DO

 

About our Process

As part of the 2018-19 Faculty Incubator program, each 2 or 3-person team authored a primer on a key education theory on the International Clinician Educator (ICE) blog. These posts were published serially over a 10-week period. Each post featured a key educationally-relevant theory by starting with a vignette that situated the theory. Following this vignette, there was an explanation, a short history of the theory, and an annotated bibliography for further reading. To ensure high quality, we then asked the #MedEd and #FOAMed online communities to join us in peer-reviewing these posts. After incorporating many of the peer review comments, each blog post was converted into a book chapter within this first volume of a series of books for budding clinician-educators – the Education Theory Made Practical series.

 

How to Cite This Book

Robinson D, Chan TM, Krzyzaniak S, Gottlieb M, Schnapp B, Spector J, Papanagnou D (eds). Education Theory Made Practical: Volume 3. 1st ed. Digital File. San Francisco, CA: Academic Life in Emergency Medicine; 2020. ISBN: 978-0-9992825-7-1. Available at: https://books.apple.com/us/book/education-theory-made-practical/id1534232421?ls=1

 

Education Theory Made Practical home page

By |2020-11-06T04:41:47-08:00Nov 6, 2020|Academic, Book Club|

The Leader’s Library: The Power of Moments | Sign Up for the Book Club

The Power of Moments in The Leader's Library

Thus far, 2020 has been a year of catastrophic events, some surprising and others disappointingly predictable, and many people are struggling to navigate the chaos, to grasp at some semblance of a routine in the face of an unpredictable near future. Time has become a blur, a coalescence of unremarkable (yet unprecedented) moments.

What if we have the possibility to intentionally create these moments, for ourselves and those around us? What if, by reframing the way we view memory, experience, and time, we could be the powerful author of our own moments?

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By |2020-08-30T20:03:46-07:00Aug 30, 2020|Academic, Book Club, Leaders Library|

The Leader’s Library: The Coffee Bean – Open call for participants

The coffee bean the leader's library book clubLife recently has been, to say the least, a hair stressful. The global pandemic, with all the resultant lifestyle upheaval, has seized a commanding presence in every minute of every day, personal and professional, and many of us are feeling the heat. There’s never been a more appropriate time then to cultivate effective coping strategies as a community, and ALiEM is here to help, with the third installment of The Leader’s Library, covering The Coffee Bean: A Simple Lesson to Create Positive Change by Jon Gordon and Damon West.

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By |2020-05-06T16:12:42-07:00May 8, 2020|Book Club, Leaders Library|

Book Club: Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor

Forget the Mentor, Find a Sponsor book - sponsorshipOne of the most common themes in advice for career advancement is “find a mentor.” But we are rarely told HOW to find a mentor, WHY we need mentors, or WHAT ROLE mentors are supposed to play in our careers. In addition to the lack of direction regarding mentorship, when you start to research “what is mentorship,” it becomes clear that there are several limitations to the benefits of this popularized mentor-mentee relationship. To see results, the key may be more than mentorship and the answer is likely sponsorship.

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By |2020-01-25T19:22:37-08:00Feb 7, 2020|Book Club, Incubators|

TLDR Book Review: The Culture Code – The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups

culture code

Have you had shifts or worked on committees where everything went smoothly? Closed loop communication happened, there was mutual respect among all the team members, and each individual felt empowered to give input even if it differed from what had already been said or done? You’ve probably also worked on shifts, in meetings, or participated in projects where it seemed like the team was falling apart, communicating on different wavelengths, and failing to have a shared understanding. You may feel like a great leader one day and a failure the next. The difference, according to The Culture Code, has everything to do with the culture of the team. In this 2018 book, Daniel Coyle explains what makes teams successful and how you can help create the culture necessary for all of your teams, committees, and groups to succeed. 

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By |2020-01-03T00:12:10-08:00Dec 20, 2019|Book Club, TLDR|

The Leader’s Library: Radical Candor | Curated Summary of the Discussion

radical candor

Welcome back to The Leader’s Library! In our second installment, throughout the week of October 14, 2019, a group of selected learners across the globe tackled Radical Candor by Kim Scott [ALiEM book summary], and generated another fascinating asynchronous dialogue on Slack. This go-round, we had 3 days of discussion with days for reflection in between. Below are the main points that emerged from our robust conversation.

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By |2019-11-10T23:10:07-08:00Nov 18, 2019|Book Club, Leaders Library|
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