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About Xiao Chi (Tony) Zhang, MD, MS

Medical Education Fellow
Department of Emergency Medicine
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Philadelphia, PA
7 08, 2018

From One Medical Student to Another: 5 Tips for Research Success

One of the most challenging aspects of medical school is the sheer volume of information that must be absorbed in a short period. This can pose a problem for those interested in developing research skills and pursuing an independent project. As colleagues, we know that our inherent curiosity is satisfied by discovering new information as much as it is by learning clinical content. We believe that it is important to showcase our hard work through a formal research project, but there are systematic barriers to finding a research mentor and team. Although there are many resources to guide you on “how” to publish, in this post we give some basic tips and tricks, from one medical student to another, on how to get involved in research and find a project that best fits your goals.

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3 06, 2018

IDEA Series | Chopped EM: A ‘Palatable’ Way to Teach a Challenging Topic to EM Residents

The Problem

idea series teaching residents quality improvement

Psychiatric and substance use disorder complaints comprise up to 12% of all Emergency Department (ED) visits.1–3 These conditions can present in a multitude of ways, making it essential for emergency physicians (EPs) to be aware of nuanced diagnostic characteristics of psychiatric illnesses in order to provide timely and appropriate care for these patients.

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1 02, 2018

IDEA Series: Trapped as a Group, Escape as a Team | Applying Gamification to Team-Building Skills

2018-02-02T11:33:46+00:00

The Problem

idea series teaching residents quality improvementProviding high-quality healthcare in the busy, often chaotic world of EM requires teamwork. Team members must overcome varied levels of training, expertise, and conflicting personalities to function as a unit. Effective teamwork and collaboration, particularly in high-stakes, high-acuity environments, can improve patient outcomes and the cost of care.1,2 Although the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) includes “interpersonal and communication skills” (ICS) as a core competency, there is no consensus as to how to effectively teach these skills. Further, military literature identifies “trust” as critical to effective communication within teams.3 To improve trust, communication, and collaboration, authors suggest a training that is safe, low-stakes, high-impact, and dynamically engaging.
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