MEdIC Series logo

Inspired by the Harvard Business Review Cases, the MEdIC Series puts difficult medical education cases under a microscope. From 2013-2018, on the fourth Friday of the month we will pose a challenging hypothetical dilemma, moderate a discussion on potential approaches, and recruit medical education experts to provide “Gold Standard” responses. Cases and responses will be made available for download as individual PDFs (i.e. one per case). Year 1-4 are also available as e-book compendiums (see below). Feel free to use them locally for your own education or in group activities with others!

Read more about the background of our process in our paper within the leading medical education journal Academic Medicine:
Chan TM, Thoma B, Lin M. Creating, Curating, and Sharing Online Faculty Development Resources. Academic Medicine. 2015;90(6):785-789. doi: 10.1097/acm.0000000000000692

Our Purpose

The purpose of the MEdIC series is to create resources that allow you to engage in ‘guerrilla’ faculty development – enticing and engaging individuals who might not have time to attend faculty development workshops to think about challenging cases in medical education. We hope to support our readership’s development by creating Expert Peer Reviewed content featuring prominent thinkers in emergency medicine (and beyond) on key topics.

Meet Our MEdiC Team

Series Editors

  • Tamara McColl, MD FRCPC MEd(c)
  • Teresa Chan, BEd MD FRCPC MHPE

Assistant Editors

  • S. Luckett-Gatopoulos, MD MSc
  • John Eicken, MD
  • Eve Purdy, BHSc MD
  • Alkarim Velji, MD
  • Brent Thoma, MA MD FRCPC MSc

Season Five Cases (2017-ongoing)

CaseOriginal PostWrap Up PostPDF link
Case 5.1: The Case of the Discriminatory PatientLinkLinkPDF
Case 5.2: The Case of the Difficult Debrief LinkLink

Bonus:
Podcast

PDF
Case 5.3: The Case of the M&M Shame GameLinkLinkPDF
Case 5.4: The Case of the Technologically-Challenged AcademicLinkLinkPDF
Case 5.5: The Case of the Night Shift StimulantsLinkLinkPDF
Case 5.6 The Case of the Post-Paternity bluesLinkLinkPDF
Case 5.7 The Case of the Orphaned PatientLinkLinkPDF
Case 5.8 The Case of the Overwhelmed SeniorLinkLinkPDF
Case 5.9 The Case of the Medication MishapLinkLinkPDF

Season Four Cases (2016-2017)

CaseOriginal PostWrap Up PostPDF link
Case 4.1: The Case of Cognitive OverloadLinkLinkPDF
Case 4.2: The Case of the Overly Attentive AttendingLinkLinkPDF
Case 4.3: The Case of the Fatiguing Fourth Year LinkLinkPDF
Case 4.4: The Case of the Resident-At-RiskLinkLinkPDF
Case 4.5: The Case of Shifting ExpectationsLinkLinkPDF
Case 4.6: The Case of the Lazy LearnersLinkLinkPDF
Case 4.7: The Case of the Solo SeniorLinkLinkPDF
Case 4.8: The Case of the Failure to FailLinkLinkPDF
Case 4.9: The Case of the Competency ConundrumLinkLinkPDF

Season Three Cases (2015-2016)

CaseOriginal PostWrap Up PostPDF link
Case 3.1: The Case of the FOAM promotionLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.2: The Case of the Patient with a No Learner PolicyLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.3: The Case of the Cackling Consulting ResidentLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.4: The Case of the Awkward AssessorsLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.5: The Case of the Catastrophic ClassroomLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.6: The Case of the Pimping PhysicianLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.7 : The Case of the Fibbing First YearLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.8 : The Case of the Terrible CodeLinkLinkPDF
Case 3.9: The Case of the Honorary AuthorshipLinkLinkPDF

Season Two Cases (2014-2015)

CaseOriginal PostWrap Up PostPDF link
Case 2.1: The Case of the Backroom BlunderLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.2: The Case of the Debriefing DebacleLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.3: The Case of the Ebola Outbreak EthicsLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.4: The Case of the Late LetterLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.5: The Case of Breaking Bad News BadlyLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.6: The Case of the Returning TravellerLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.7: The Case of the Financial FiascoLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.8: The Case of the FOAM Faux PasLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.9: The Case of the Flirtatious PatientLinkLinkPDF
Case 2.10: The Case of the Unseasoned SeniorLinkLinkPDF

Season One Cases (2013-2014)

CaseOriginal PostWrap Up PostPDF link
Case 1.1: The Case of the Difficult ConsultLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.2: The Case of the Facebook FaceplantLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.3: The Case of the Woman in WhiteLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.4: The Case of the New Job NegotiationsLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.5: The Case of the Magnificent MentorLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.6: The Case of the Terrible TeammateLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.7: The Case of the Culture ClashLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.8: The Case of the Not-so-Humorous HumerusLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.9: The Case of the Unexpected OutcomeLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.10: The Case of the Exasperated EducatorLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.11: The Case of the Justified JuniorLinkLinkPDF
Case 1.12: The Case of the Absentee AudienceLinkLinkPDF

Free e-Books: MEdIC Season 1-3 Compilations

Click on this direct iTunes link or the picture below to go there. You may also go to our ResearchGate link to get the PDF version if you are unable to access the iTunes e-book.

MEdIC Cover
Chan TM, Thoma B, Lin M (Eds). (2014). Medical Education in Cases: Volume 1 (1st Edition). Digital File. San Francisco, CA; Academic Life in Emergency Medicine. ISBN: 978-0-9907948-0-6.
MEdICYear2BookCover
Chan TM, McColl T, Luckett-Gatopoulos S, Purdy E, Thoma B (Eds).(2016).Medical Education in Cases: Volume 2. San Francisco, CA; Academic Life in Emergency Medicine. ISBN: 978-0-9907948-0-6.
DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.2555.1522
Chan TM, McColl T, Luckett-Gatopoulos S, Purdy E, Eicken J, Thoma B. (2017). Medical Education in Cases: Volume 3 (1st Edition). Digital File. San Francisco, CA; Academic Life in Emergency Medicine. ISBN: 978-0-9907948-9-9.

Newly available (July 20, 2017)

The Volume 4 e-book is out now.  You may go to our ResearchGate link to get the PDF version, and it is also available on iTunes as an e-book.


Did you know…?

ALiEM MEdIC series was selected as a “Top Five What Works” abstract and will be presented from the podium at the International Conference on Residency Education in 2014. Dr. Teresa Chan will represent the ALiEM Team. On October 25, 2014, Dr. Chan also presented the first ALiEM Press production the ALiEM MEdIC E-Book.

MEdIC Series: The Case of the New Job Negotiations

downloadThe final year of residency is challenging.  Your responsibilities at work increase. Exams loom. And the job or fellowship hunt begins…

This month in the MEdIC series we present the case of Jamal, a senior emergency medicine resident who is torn between the job he desires and the job that others are suggesting that he pursue. Join us as we ‘listen in’ on his conversation with his friend Cindy (a Pulmonology fellow) as they compare their adventures in new job negotiations.

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2017-01-04T18:32:43-08:00

MEdIC: The Case of the Woman in White – Expert and Community Response

LabCoatsThe Case of the Woman in White brought out passionate replies from the ALiEM community. While Brent Thoma (@Brent_Thoma) and I (@TChanMD) have hosted several passionate discussions on MEdIC cases, none of which have inspired such deep and thoughtful responses. Both male and female attendings, residents, medical students and even a patient weighed in.
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2019-02-19T18:09:49-08:00

MEdIC Series: The Case of the Woman in White

LabCoatsOnce upon a time nurses were all women in hats and white skirts and doctors were readily identifiable by their formal dress, and deep, masculine voices. Changes in demographics, fashion and the health care teams have shattered these stereotypes.  In doing so, it has become more difficult for our patients and fellow practitioners to identify the diverse members of a modern health care team.

This week we present the case of Jenny and Justin:  a couple of residents who are struggling with the assumptions of their patients and colleagues that result from their youthful looks and – in Jenny’s case – gender.

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2019-02-19T18:08:59-08:00

MEdIC: The Case of the Facebook Faceplant – Expert and Community Response

computerOn September 27th we posted the second case of the MEdIC (Medical Education In Cases) series facilitated by Dr. Brent Thoma (@BoringEM) and me (@TChanMD). The Case of the Facebook Faceplant involved a “resident at risk” who lashed out on Facebook about an experience with a nurse. Our readers were thrust into the role of a supervising attending physician who sees the post. Once again, we were overwhelmed by the number and quality of responses in the comments and on Twitter.

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MEdIC series: The Case of the Facebook Faceplant

Medical Education has taken social media by storm. Twitter, Facebook, the Blogosphere…  Medical Educators have used these often misused and misinterpreted forms of social interaction to share resources and educate. However, social media is quickly merging our private and public personae. As educators, we must be savvy and up-to-date regarding our learners’ social media usage, since the worlds can often collide.

This week we present the case of Greg, a junior faculty member and attending emergency physician, who is experiencing a social media-mediated quandary.

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2017-01-04T18:32:43-08:00

MEdIC: The Case of the Difficult Consult – Expert and Community Response

medic documentOn August 30th I posted the first case of the MEdIC (Medical Education In Cases) series that will be facilitated by Dr. Teresa Chan (@TChanMD) and I (@BoringEM). The Case of the Difficult Consult involved a junior resident in the emergency department who had a consult go bad. Our readers were thrust into the role of an attending physician wanting to help.

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MEdIC series: The Case of the Difficult Consult

phone

Inspired by the Harvard Business Review Cases and led by Dr. Teresa Chan (@TChanMD) and Dr. Brent Thoma (@BoringEM), the Medical Education In Cases (MEdIC) series puts difficult medical education cases under a microscope. On the fourth Friday of the month we will pose a challenging hypothetical dilemma, moderate a discussion on potential approaches, and recruit medical education experts to provide “Gold Standard” responses. Cases and responses will be made available for download in pdf format – feel free to use them!

If you’re a medical educator with a pedagogical problem, we want to get you a MEdiC. Send us your most difficult dilemmas and help the rest of us to bring our teaching game to the next level.

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2016-11-11T19:03:34-08:00