About Michael Gisondi, MD

Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Education
Department of Emergency Medicine
Stanford University
Editor, ALiEM EM Match Advice series

EM Match Advice 37: EM Program Directors Reflect on the 2022 Match

EM Match Advice 10 year table residency match

In this 37th episode of EM Match Advice, we discuss the results of the 2021-22 EM Residency Match with lots of shocking numbers and surprises to review. The table above lists the trends and data since 2014, extracted from the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) site [1]. Could this have been foreseen? What does this mean for the 2022-23 EM Match season? In this podcast, Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin host the following esteemed panel of 3 program directors to review this juicy table and discuss the future:

  • Dr. Abra Fant (Northwestern University)
  • Dr. Sara Krzyzaniak (Stanford University)
  • Dr. Bonnie Kaplan (Denver Health)

More Numbers from ERAS/AAMC by Program

emergency medicine EM Match Advice ERAS table

EM Match Advice Podcast

 

Read and Listen to the Other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

 

References and Additional Reading

  1. National Residency Match Program: Data and Reports
  2. Pelletier-Bui AE, Schnapp BH, Smith LG, et al. Making Our Preference Known: Preference Signaling in the Emergency Medicine Residency Application. West J Emerg Med. 2021;23(1):72-75. Published 2021 Dec 17. doi:10.5811/westjem.2021.10.53996. PMID 35060866
  3. Preference/Program Signaling (PS) in Emergency Medicine. CORD website, 2022.
By |2022-05-28T09:30:51-07:00May 11, 2022|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

EM Match Advice 36: It’s Time to Make Your Rank List

Now that interview season for residency match has concluded, our residency director panel tackles the hot topic of making your rank list, which includes “love letters” to programs and second look visits. In this podcast, Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin host an esteemed panel of 3 program directors, Dr. Emily Fisher (University of Oklahoma), Dr. William Paolo (SUNY Upstate), and Dr. Michael Van Meter (University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) to discuss these issues. Good luck to everyone in the match this year!

EM Match Advice Podcast

Read and Listen to the Other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

By |2022-04-26T16:24:10-07:00Feb 9, 2022|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

EM Match Advice: Where did all the jobs go, and did the applicants follow?

In this episode of EM Match Advice, our panel takes on the tough issues of 2021. Specifically we discuss the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Workforce Study [1] that projects fewer jobs for emergency physicians and the hot-off-the-press ERAS data showing a drop in the number of EM residency applicants, compared to 2 years ago. Did one cause the other? In this podcast, Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin host an esteemed panel of 3 program directors, Dr. Cassandra Bradby (East Carolina University), Dr. Adam Kellogg (Baystate Health), and Dr. Craig Krausz (Saint Louis University).

The Numbers

  • The ACEP Workforce Study projects a whopping 7,845 excess of emergency physicians in 2030 who could be left without jobs. And our very smart medical students have been eyeing those numbers carefully.
  • While EM is still an attractive specialty for many medical students, some enter this year’s residency application season with a trepidation that hasn’t been seen before. And a good deal of  students clearly chose a specialty other than EM, with approximately 200 fewer applicants projected this cycle, compared to 2 years ago. Most of that drop came from students at LCME-accredited medical schools. [Silver lining: These numbers may make for a buyer’s market that greatly favors the students in the upcoming Match.]
  • Below is a summary of the ERAS data, pulled from their downloadable Excel data. Note that these data were collected on October 3 of each year and only summarize data from EM-only residencies (not EM/IM or EM/FM).
Characteristic2016-172017-182018-192019-202020-21*2021-22
Number of EM residency applicants3,2203,3303,3383,601x3,408
Average number of submitted applications in EM49.153.3557.8659.75x61.23
Average of applications received per EM program883.3866.6850.82874.58x772.82
AAMC’s ERAS data for 2016-2022 for the specialty of Emergency Medicine, collected on October 3 of each year
(* Because of the pandemic, the 2020-21 season’s timeline was shifted later by about 1 month, resulting in non-comparable data.)

EM Match Advice Podcast

Additional Resources

Read and Listen to the other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

References

  1. Marco CA, Courtney DM, Ling LJ, et al. The Emergency Medicine Physician Workforce: Projections for 2030 [published online ahead of print, 2021 Aug 2]. Ann Emerg Med. 2021; doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2021.05.029. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34353653.
By |2021-10-27T09:50:17-07:00Oct 30, 2021|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

Stanford’s INFODEMIC Conference on COVID-19 Misinformation: Open-access podcasts

In July 2021, Dr. Vivek Murthy became the first U.S. Surgeon General to declare health misinformation a public health crisis. Specifically, COVID-19 vaccine misinformation and disinformation on social media greatly affects vaccination rates in certain populations. Rapid increases in reliable health information about COVID-19 can be overshadowed by the spread of even greater amounts of misinformation, leading to an ‘infodemic.’

The World Health Organization defines an infodemic as:

“… too much information including false or misleading information in digital and physical environments during a disease outbreak. It causes confusion and risk-taking behaviours that can harm health. It also leads to mistrust in health authorities and undermines the public health response. An infodemic can intensify or lengthen outbreaks when people are unsure about what they need to do to protect their health and the health of people around them.”

INFODEMIC Conference on Social Media and COVID-19 Misinformation

On August 26, 2021, Stanford University’s Department of Emergency Medicine and Ethics, Society, and Technology Hub co-sponsored a unique conference to address this issue, “INFODEMIC: A Stanford Conference on Social Media and COVID-19 Misinformation.” Speakers presented virtually from around the world including experts in social media, health policy, ethics, and medicine. The conference focused on the causes of COVID-19 misinformation and mitigation strategies. Vaccine Confidence, Vaccine Hesitancy, and Vaccine Equity were among the main topics of the meeting. INFODEMIC also featured representatives from Facebook, Google, and Twitter, as well as physician influencers, to discuss the role of social media companies to address misinformation online.

Below are recordings of each of the INFODEMIC conference presentations, presented as podcasts. Video recordings of these presentations are also available to view online. The conference agenda and featured speakers are listed on the Stanford INFODEMIC website.

Podcasts

By |2021-10-06T19:40:30-07:00Oct 8, 2021|Academic, COVID19|

EM Match Advice: Program Directors Reflect on the 2021 Residency Match

How competitive is EM emergency medicine match EM Match Advice

Dr. Mike Gisondi and Dr. Michelle Lin return for their annual review of the most recent Match in emergency medicine (EM) in latest episode of EM Match Advice. They were joined by a panel of 3 outstanding program directors, Dr. Jacob Ufberg (Temple), Dr. Amita Sudhir (University of Virgina), and Dr. William Caputo (Staten Island Medical Center). Was the EM Match more competitive this year? That’s a complicated question and you need to listen to the podcast discussion for the nuanced answer.

The Slide: The Nitty Gritty Annual Numbers of the EM Match

“The Slide” above is a summary of EM Match statistics taken from the annual National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) Data and Results publication over the last 10 years. Trends suggest that EM is becoming less competitive year over year; however, 2021 saw the greatest number of unmatched medical students who were EM bound. What are the most competitive specialties and how does EM compare? Generally, we use the % fill rate with LCME students to determine the competitiveness of a specialty. That is the % of entry-level positions filled by allopathic senior medical students from the US, Puerto Rico, and Canada. Who’s on top this year? Four combined programs that each have very few PGY-1 positions in the match all filled with 100% LCME students: EM-anesthesiology, medicine-anesthesiology, pediatrics-anesthesiology, and pediatrics-PMR. Here’s how a few of the other specialties fared:

  • Thoracic surgery 93.5%
  • Plastic surgery 89.3%
  • Vascular surgery 82.3%
  • Orthopedic surgery 80.5%
  • Obstetrics-gynecology 66.7%
  • Surgery 65.6%
  • Emergency medicine 62.1%
  • Pediatrics 60.3%
  • Radiology 58.2%
  • Internal medicine 39%

Podcast: Program Directors Reflecting on the 2021 EM Residency Match

Read and Listen to the other EM Match Advice Episodes

Blog posts: https://www.aliem.com/em-match-advice-series/

By |2021-07-19T19:27:46-07:00Jul 21, 2021|EM Match Advice, Podcasts|

Reading from the Silver Linings Playbook: The ALiEM Connect Project

ALiEM Connect graduation

It feels like yesterday that we were sheltered-in-place, staring at our computers, wondering, “So now what?” 

As COVID-19 paused all in-person educational sessions, the early morning residency conference we used to begrudgingly join quickly became something that we profoundly missed. While we can now be “present” while wearing sweatpants and a button-down shirt, we miss the human connection. Many of us would gladly even suffer through traffic just to be a part of this morning conference tradition.

As educators and innovators, we know what a disruptive force the COVID-19 pandemic has been to the medical community. It has strained our medical and healthcare systems and has irrevocably altered our day-to-day lives. Without a doubt, the pandemic also changed how we delivered educational content to our learners over the past year.

Scholars have written about how likely this pandemic will likely precipitate the much-needed digital transformation of healthcare and health professions education that many of us have expected and hoped for. But while some of these innovations are born out of necessity, they may also inadvertently isolate us from the experiential aspects of education and human interaction that provide meaning to our work. For the ALiEM team, we cherish the opportunity to be part of some of these significant innovative and positive “disruptions,” further aligning our goal of creating an impactful and fulfilling academic life in emergency medicine. 

The Backstory

As a remote team working across continents, the ALiEM team has thrived on digital connection for over a decade. With excellent collaborators and volunteers representing different parts of the world, our daily operations require us to stay connected and work asynchronously to achieve our goals and deliverables. When the lockdowns hit, we leveraged its impact on physical distancing and leaned into connecting with each other even more! They say “chance favors the prepared mind,” and there we were, already on Slack and yearning for the opportunity to harness the power of teamwork using our shared passions, individual creative strengths, and enthusiastic and supportive emojis. There were moments of creating, moments of celebration, and moments of simply being with each other – often through an evening #WifiAndWine.

By the Ides of March 2020, an auspicious time indeed, we knew we were at a turning point. Our friends and work families had been working on the front lines combating the pandemic locally, gathering PPE, and studying the effects of a virus we knew next to nothing about. New information was coming in daily, and the signal-to-noise ratio was low. In some ways, to escape the disruptions going on all around us, we banded together to focus our unique energies toward creating something as novel as the virus itself in the realm of free open-access medical education.

At a time where everyone was feeling alone, we asked ourselves how we could support the joy of learning from and with each other? In truly whirlwind fashion, the first ALiEM Connect conference went from idea to execution in less than 2 weeks, a record-breaking time even for ALiEM. Thank especially to the American Board of Emergency Medicine for sponsoring these events.

We recently made it to the semi-finals at the CORD/ACEP Innovator of the Year competition, where we shared the below video capturing the fun, collaboration, and innovative outcome of our efforts. Oh, and the familiar ratatat of Slack.

Making this a Multiple Win

The secret sauce of the ALiEM team is that we have a diverse group of people, each of whom brings their own perspective and that we are able to share with one another liberally. Dr. Michelle Lin encouraged an environment that is psychologically safe and supportive since the inception of the ALiEM enterprise. It is out of this space that our diverse team was able to successfully bring a massively successful project to fruition amid a global pandemic. What started as a small brainstorming session blossomed into ALiEM Connect – 3 distinct remote conferences featuring nationally-recognized educators and thought leaders enjoyed by residents across the country.

It’s difficult to express as a linear narrative, but looking back, it seems as though our team divided into unique roles without a second thought. Just like a production company, we had the front and back of the house. Those in the front made sure to help get people in the seats to watch; stage managers and coordinators ensured that every part of each of the ALiEM Connect experiences was phenomenally smooth. We had talented individuals who acted as hosts and speakers to ensure that each of these experiences was top-notch and engaging. In the back, Drs. Mary Haas, Yusuf Yilmaz, and Teresa Chan sprung quickly into action to create a program evaluation strategy for our ALiEM Connect program, including a formal institutional review board exemption! All the while, testing and vetting platforms and methods to distribute the material were ongoing. We built upon each technological skill, learned new platforms, and trialed different features. We had barely decided on an open, free, and accessible platform (which was, in fact, no individual platform but an amalgamation of many!) before sending out the invites.

But the fun didn’t stop there! We’re the “academic” life in emergency medicine! How could we not also share our results with the traditional academic community? Within days of finishing our first ALiEM Connect experience, our program evaluation team generated the scaffolding of a manuscript to put together our thoughts and analyze the evaluation data collected. We harnessed the power of metrics from social media platforms (YouTube, Slack, Twitter), website analytics, and end-user experiences. Harnessing all of these analytics and communicating the right message with our academic medicine community was important to inform and help others to replicate similar approaches to their residents. Our team used ready to use metrics which came from YouTube analytics. But we did not stop there as we needed more reports of how the residents and programs interacted during the Connect events in the backchannel, Slack. We developed Python supported software to export and analyze all the messages happening in separate channels. We developed a “Emoji Cloud” to see how the reactions happened, and closely analyzed the messages during the event.

Given the true novelty of the experience, we figured we might as well shoot for the moon, as they say, by submitting our innovation description paper to Academic Medicine. After all, even if they didn’t accept it, we might get some constructive reviews, to say the least. As innovators, we are comfortable with the possibility of failure. We understand the value of the saying, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take,” and were prepared to accept “no” as an answer. With that, we took a calculated risk, making use of the same collaborative strategy to craft a manuscript, and clicked submit.

…And we’re glad we took that shot! We are excited to share that what we sent was indeed accepted and express our gratitude for the chance to share our low-cost approach to a large-scale, nationwide residency conference! You may read the Published Ahead-of-Print version of our paper.

Moral of the story…

You might be asking yourself, “What’s the moral of the story here? Of course, with enough academics and experts, yeah, you got a paper published. Cool…” But the papers aren’t the point. In fact, during the COVID-19 pandemic, more papers have been published than ever before – more research is being done, and our whole field is changing. The point is… this is how we got to ENJOY the academic life during a pandemic! We made lemonade (and several other desserts!) out of the lemons we were handed. New knowledge comes from thinking big and trying new things. Turns out, sometimes you also have to write about those experiences and share them with others.

As emergency physicians, we know we’re good in a crisis. But this experience reminded us that by surrounding ourselves with amazing people, we could get a surprising amount of work done (at record speed) and have a fantastically memorable time along the way. The moral of this story is that when you bring great people together and give them a chance to get to know each other, magic happens. ALiEM Connect happens. And we impact more people than we can possibly meet at the touch of our keyboards. We are so grateful for the chance to work alongside all the wonderful people at each of our institutions every day. Still, also, we are indebted to those who are our digital family. Thank you to all of you who make initiatives like ALiEM Connect possible. Academic life in emergency medicine is all about bringing a great team together.

So is the ALiEM team.

Teaching LGBTQ+ Health: 10 Clinical Pearls

lgbtq+ health teaching course

Are you confident in your skills when taking care of LGBTQ+ patients? Are you able to teach principles of LGBTQ+ health to trainees in your clinical practice and the classroom setting? Learners across the health professions demand improved LGBTQ+ health content and additional training opportunities in their schools’ curricula. However, most clinician educators received little, if any, training in LGBTQ+ health when they were students.

10 Clinical Pearls on Teaching About LGBTQ+ Health

The following are some sneak-peak clinical pearls from the Teaching LGBTQ+ Health online course that just launched. This open access, interactive, CME course was published in conjunction with National LGBT Health Awareness Week (March 22-26, 2021). It was developed by Stanford Medicine and designed by Dr. Michael Gisondi (Stanford Emergency Medicine), Timothy Keyes (Stanford SOM), Shana Zucker (Tulane SOM), and Deila Bumgardner (Stanford EdTech) in collaboration with the Medical Student Pride Alliance

  1. LGTBQ+ health encompasses so much more than the historical, one-dimensional portrayals of gay men previously used to teach about HIV/AIDS.
  2. Treat your LGBTQ+ patients with dignity and respect by correctly using LGBTQ+ health vocabulary. 
  3. Language is both fluid and deeply personal—not all LGBTQ+ patients refer to themselves with similar terms, and the ways in which these terms are used may change over time.
  4. Sex, gender, and sexual orientation are related but distinct concepts. 
  5. Intersecting minority statuses have a synergistic effect on the health and health-seeking behaviors of LGBTQ+ patients.
  6. The CDC recommends the use of ‘The 5 P’s of Sexual Health’ framework for obtaining a sexual history.
  7. In accordance with the PARTNER2 study, ‘undetectable = untransmittable.’
  8. Compliance with PrEP (pre exposure prophylaxis) for HIV reduces the risk of acquiring HIV by approximately 99%.
  9. Transmasculine patients seek routine primary care and Pap testing less frequently than cisgender patients.
  10. Create inclusive clinical environments that are affirming to queer patients, staff, and students.

Online Course: Teaching LGBTQ+ Health

Teaching LGBTQ+ Health is a new, online, faculty development course designed to bridge the gap between the expectation of faculty teaching competency and a lack of previous training. The intended audience includes educators across the health professions, though the content is also made freely available to all providers, students, patients, and other interested individuals.

This course serves as an introductory primer that assumes no prior knowledge of LGBTQ+ health issues. The course includes both LGBTQ+ health content and recommendations for teaching this material to trainees in any discipline or clinical department. Educators may freely download portions of the course for use in their daily clinical teaching or their school’s curriculum.

This online course is divided into modules that review topics such as LGBTQ+ Vocabulary, Social and Behavioral Determinants of Queer Health, Disease Prevention, and Teaching Strategies, among others. A comprehensive glossary of key terms and 3 interactive, clinical case examples are provided to reinforce key concepts. The entire course is evidence-based and extensive references to medical literature are provided. 

If you learn something new by from our course, we respectfully ask that you share the course within your clinical department and with a few colleagues outside your institution.

By |2021-03-19T10:57:09-07:00Mar 23, 2021|CME, Public Health|
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