This Book Club series led by Dr. Nikita Joshi (@NJoshi8) and Dr. Jordana Haber (@JoJoHaber), introduces you to books that are pertinent to medical practice and the culture of medical education. Discussion will be held every other month. The goal is to share books, both nonfiction and fiction, medical and not, that can deepen our clinical practice and commitment to delivering great medical education to learners. Whether you are a physician, nurse, paramedic, or allied health care provider, we would love for you to join in on the discussion on this blog.

ALiEM Book Club: Beyond the ED Series

The ALiEM Book Club’s Beyond the ED Series headed by Dr. Taku Taira (@TakuTaira) is meant to be a way to share books that leaders within the medical community love and treasure without having the usual bookclub discussion associated with it. These books are sure to challenge and enrich the reader.

Suggestions

There are so many great books out there and not enough time to get to them. Please let us know if you come across any book that you feel would be worthwhile reading as a part of our book club!

Previous books

DateBookAuthorBook Discussion and Commentary
December 2016Show and Tell: How Everybody Can Make Extraordinary PresentationsDan Roam
November 20, 2016Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us AllDavid and Tom KelleyBlog Link
October 16, 2016On the Move: A LifeOliver SacksBlog Link
August 14, 2016A Thousand Naked Strangers: A Paramedic’s Wild Ride to the Edge and BackKevin HazzardBlog Link
June 10, 2016The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer AgeRobert WachterBlog Link
May 13, 2016Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to LeadSheryl SandbergBlog Link
April 8, 2016When Breath Becomes AirPaul KalanithiBlog Link
March 12, 2016Steal Like An ArtistAustin KleonBlog Link
February 12, 2016Bouncebacks! Emergency Department Cases: ED ReturnsMichael B. Weinstock, Ryan Longstreth, Gregory L. HenryBlog Link
January 15, 2016Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster
Svetlana AlexievichBlog Link
January 8, 2016A Few Short Notes on Tropical Butterflies: StoriesJohn MurrayBlog Link
November 17, 2015Let Me Heal: The Opportunity to Preserve Excellence in American Medicine
Kenneth LudmererBlog Link
October 9, 2015Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic
Sam QuinonesBlog Link
August 14, 2015The White Coat Investor: A Doctor’s Guide To Personal Finance And Investing
James M. DahleBlog Link
July 10, 2015The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of ColorblindnessMichelle AlexanderBlog Link
June 12, 2015How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical ThinkingJordan EllenbergBlog Link
May 8, 2015We Need to Talk About KevinLionel ShriverBlog Link
April 10, 2015The Art of ChoosingSheena IyengarBlog Link
March 21, 2015Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the EndAtul GawandeBlog Link
February 13, 2015The Emperor of all MaladiesSiddhartha MukherjeeBlog Link
January 16, 2015Brain on Fire: My Month of MadnessSusannah CahalanBlog Link
December 12, 2014Risk Savvy: How to Make Good DecisionsGerd GigerenzerBlog Link
November 21, 2014Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of TellingEdgar ScheinBlog Link
October 10, 2014When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary TestsLeana Wen and Joshua KosowskyBlog Link
September 19, 2014A History of Present Illness: StoriesLouise AronsonBlog Link
July 11, 2014David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling GiantsMalcolm GladwellBlog Link
May 12, 2014How We DieSherwin NulandBlog Link
March 14, 2014What Doctors FeelDanielle OfriBlog Link
February 14, 2014DriveDaniel PinkBlog Link
January 10, 2014One Room School HouseSalman KhanBlog Link
December 13, 2013Five Days at MemorialSheri FinkBlog Link
Google Hangout on Air
November 8, 2013Interpreter of Maladies – A short story “Temporary Matter”
Jhumpa LahiriBlog Link
Podcast Wrap Up
October 11, 2013The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at WorkShawn AchorBlog Link
Google Hangout on Air video
September 13, 2012House of GodSamuel ShemBlog Link
August 9, 2013The Checklist ManifestoAtul GawandeBlog Link
Curated Commentary
July 19, 2013Difficult Conversations
D Stone, B Patton, S HeenBlog Link
June 28, 2013The Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksRebecca SklootBlog Link

Past Book Club Leadership

Dr. Teresa Chan (@TChanMD)
Dr. Brent Thoma (@Brent_Thoma)

* Disclaimer: We have no affiliations financial or otherwise with the authors, the books, hyperlinks, videos or Amazon.

ALiEM Book Club Wrap Up: A Temporary Matter

InterpreterofmaladiescoverThe November book club selection was a short story A Temporary Matter from the collection Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri. The goal in selecting the story was to gain an understanding of how doctors impact the lives of patients, even in the briefest of encounters. For this month, we do a 14-minute book club wrap up in podcast form!  Dr. Teresa Chan and I discuss the story, significance to clinical practice, and announce next month’s selection.

2016-11-11T19:04:43-08:00

ALiEM Bookclub: A Temporary Matter story in Interpreter of Maladies

Interpreterofmaladiescover“Her placenta had weakened and she’d had a cesarean, though not quickly enough. The doctor explained that these things happen. He smiled in the kindest way it was possible to smile at people known only professionally. Shoba would be back on her feet in a few weeks. There was nothing to indicate that she would not be able to have children in the future.”
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2016-11-11T19:04:16-08:00

ALiEM Book Club: Reflecting on a Happy Coincidence

Happiness-Advantage_ARTCoincidence can be very fortuitous. How exciting was it to have Shawn Achor deliver his keynote address about the Happiness Advantage at ACEP this past week? Three days after our Book Club Review was released? Best part of it all – none of it was planned. That definitely was a ‘happy coincidence’. 😀

Though I was not there, my Twitter feed lit up with Happiness resounding from ACEP on that first day. It seems his message resounded with many in the audience.

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2016-11-11T19:04:16-08:00

ALiEM Bookclub: The Happiness Advantage

Happiness-Advantage_ART

Introduction

Happiness at work. If you’re like so many of the seasoned physicians in my life, this might seem like an oxymoron. But that’s exactly what Shawn Achor suggests can be your status quo. The old axiom that if you are successful you will become happier is out-dated and, as it turns out, not evidence-based. It seems like many things in medicine, we may have had it backwards. Maybe, he suggests, if you find a way to make yourself happier – you’ll actually be a better doctor…

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2018-01-30T02:47:20-08:00

ALiEM Bookclub: The House of God

Screen Shot 2013-08-11 at 7.11.29 AMWritten as satire when published first, The House of God polarized the medical community. Doctors in training cheered the book as a voice for their generation to describe the grueling nature of medical training. Others were appalled by the crass language and apparent lack of humanity when describing patient care. Reading the book became a rite of passage for young trainees. (more…)

2016-11-11T19:03:47-08:00

The Checklist Manifesto: ALiEM Book Club Synopsis

Our dear readers have chimed in and we’ve received amazing commentary and feedback regarding this month’s book The Checklist Manifesto. Please read the summary of the discussion below.

CHECKLISTS ARE EVERYWHERE IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Our readers have spotted checklists in a number of places including PALS/ACLS algorithms, Procedural Sedation protocols, and Clinical Decision Rules. Dr. Javier Benitez (@jvrbntz) stated that he uses a checklist for resuscitations at the start of shifts. Dr. Michelle Lin (@M_Lin) stated “We already use our own mental checklists in Med[icine]. It’s just not explicitly shared. Should have more overt shared checklists.”

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2019-02-19T18:09:09-08:00

ALiEM Bookclub: The Checklist Manifesto

Introduction

Checklists have now almost become status quo in current medicine.  My earliest encounter with the surgical checklist phenomenon was during PGY1 as an off-service intern. At this point, early adopters were running around with “Checkmark” safety-pins on their surgical caps, trying to encourage everyone to take up the cause. There were jokes and exasperated sighs each time a case started, but most complied with the task at the behest of opinion leaders (often the senior OR nurses in the room). Two years later I returned to see a culture change. OR teams seemed to communicate better, things seemed to flow.

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2016-11-11T19:02:41-08:00