Teaching in the age of COVID-19: Teaching with tech while socially distancing

social distancing

With the arrival of SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19) in North America, programs are facing the need to reconsider how they deliver didactic education to their learners. The ACGME only allows for 20% of the curriculum to be delivered in an asynchronous fashion. The remainder is delivered through traditional didactic means, including “small-group sessions, such as break-out groups, serially repeated conference sessions, practicum sessions, or large-group planned educational activities.” With mandatory social distancing likely to become standard practice, we present multiple solutions to bridge the gap between live, in-person conferences and asynchronous materials.

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Announcing ALIEM Remote

We are proud to announce the ALiEM Remote series. 2020 has presented a challenging set of circumstances with an ongoing COVID pandemic, uncertainty in the workplace, and multiple educational closures at every level. With our remote series, we aim to help ameliorate these challenges by providing you with great tips and tricks for remote work, remote education, and a list of speakers ready and willing to go virtual for your next department meeting or residency conference. We want to provide everyone in emergency medicine a centralized place to find resources on how to work, learn, educate, and live remotely.

Click below to go to our ALiEM Remote page!

AliEM remote

By |2020-04-02T13:57:33-07:00Mar 13, 2020|Administrative, COVID19, Medical Education|

Building Equipment Kits for Streamlined Care

medical equipment kits

In the setting of emergent care, the ability to access equipment rapidly and reliably can be a deciding factor in patient outcome. Poor stocking, inconsistent organization, and dispersal of equipment throughout a large geographic area are realities of practice as well as barriers to rapid and effective patient care. Equipment kits are a great way to ensure rapid access to a select set of tools to deal with emergent scenarios. They result in both decreased time to arrival and decreased time to successful completion of procedure.​1,2​ Scenarios that can benefit from organized and well provisioned kits include central or peripheral access, airway management, initial stabilization, monitor application, chest tube placement, or cricothyroidotomy. A word of caution: equipment kits are not a substitute for skill and cannot be thought of as a fix-all. They keep a specific set of equipment in an easy-to-locate, all-in-one package for use in a predetermined set of scenarios.

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By |2019-09-05T08:56:05-07:00Sep 11, 2019|Administrative, EMS|

10 Tips to Improve Patient Satisfaction in the Emergency Department

Exceptional communication is essential when providing care to patients in the ED. This is especially true given that we don’t have a preexisting relationship with our patients. They have never seen us before, have little or no information about us, and didn’t choose us. They are typically anxious, uncomfortable, and would probably rather be somewhere else. Exceptional communication allows patients to gain trust in us, in our skills, and in our recommendations. Strong communication skills not only allow physician and non-physician staff to gather relevant information and share important findings, but also help improve healthcare outcomes, reduce misunderstandings, and minimize litigation. Below are 10 pearls, divided into 4 habits, to help you get the most out of the clinical encounter and improve your patient’s care experience.
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By |2018-04-25T16:00:02-07:00Mar 29, 2018|Administrative|

ED Charting and Coding: Critical Care Time

After a STEMI activation from the field on Monday morning, the cardiac catheterization team scoops the patient away shortly after the paramedics arrive in the Emergency Department (ED). “Well that was a smooth and seamless resuscitation. The patient was barely in the ED for more than 15 minutes,” you think to yourself. You diligently complete your critical care documentation, noting 20 minutes of critical care time, before seeing your next patient. A few weeks later the chart is bounced back and noted as an erroneous documentation of critical care time. The coding department notifies you that the case will be billed as a Level 3 visit (E/M code #99283). Why is that the case?

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By |2019-02-19T18:51:56-08:00Jul 17, 2017|Administrative, Critical Care/ Resus|

ED Charting and Coding: Medical Decision Making (MDM)

In this ED Charting and Coding Series, we have covered Introduction to ED Charting and Coding (PV Card); the History of Present Illness & Past Medical, Family, Social History; the Review of Systems; and the Physical Exam. At last we arrive at the crux of the chart: Medical Decision Making (MDM). In this final section, you show your work and your thought process.

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By |2016-11-16T07:40:04-08:00Nov 16, 2016|Administrative|

ED Charting and Coding: Physical Exam (PE)

computer-charting-TEXT-canstockphoto17902161“What do I see, hear, and smell when I walk into the room?” While the oral boards challenge you to perform the physical exam in a certain way, the day to day examination of patients can vary dramatically. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), however, has physical exam guidelines for billing that conform to neither the exam you learned as a medical student nor the one you’ve refined as a resident. These disparities between what you do and how you’re asked to document it can lead to charts that are frequently down-coded or at risk if audited. The following discussion tries to unravel some of these twisted regulations and will provide tips and tricks on how to improve your physical exam documentation for coding and billing.

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By |2016-11-17T12:00:04-08:00Nov 9, 2016|Administrative|
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