Andragogy: How adults learn best

Andragogy refers to learning strategies which help adults to learn more effectively.

It is a term that was first used by Alexander Kapp in 1833 and later expanded by Malcolm Knowles to fit the needs of adult education. The concept is contrasted with pedagogy in which the child is lead through the learning process by the teacher. In andragogy most of the learning is self-directed and the teacher is a facilitator in the learning process.  (more…)

By |2016-11-16T09:38:06-08:00Nov 29, 2012|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: Evaluating your written evaluation of a learner

EvaluationChecklist3dAs a new faculty, one of the first challenges that I encountered was completing evaluation forms for medical students and residents. In our department, a Daily Evaluation Card (DEC) is to be completed at the end of every shift for each learner. These DEC’s are then collated by the program directors to yield a summative final rotation evaluation.

What I wondered was: how can I best use these DEC’s to help learners progress as medical professionals and at the same time provide critical information for the PD’s?

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By |2016-11-15T22:24:53-08:00Nov 7, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article Review: Performing a database search

At the end of each Academic Medicine journal issue, there is a great “last page” one-page teaching point in medical education research. There’s no earth-shattering news, but they are great reviews of key elements in education research.

The most recent issue reviews the process of performing an effective database search in medical education research. It was authored by my friend Lauren, who is a medical education librarian at Stanford and a co-author with me on an annual series “Critical Appraisal in Emergency Medicine Education Research”.

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By |2018-01-30T02:24:16-08:00Aug 1, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: Message for new generation of educators

Feedback

An interesting article was published in Medical Education which you don’t see too often in journals. It’s a first-person reflective account of Dr. Ronald Harden’s long and internationally well-regarded career in medical education. No p-value. No sample size calculation. His experiences and lessons learned provide great insight. Here’s his advice to current and future educators.

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By |2016-11-15T22:25:03-08:00Jul 25, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|