Diagnoses that sound alike

Emergency Medicine is as much about taking care of undifferentiated patients as it is about naming specific signs, symptoms and diagnoses. After 10 years of medical training I’ve noticed that there are a few diseases that require us to stop and think a bit. In particular I’m thinking about conditions that share these features:

  1. They sound-alike, look-alike, or share words or roots of words
  2. They affect a specific organ or part of the body
  3. They have very different etiologies, implications, prognosis and treatment

The two sets of diagnoses that I encounter most frequently with this problem are Mesenteric Ischemia (or Ischemic Bowel) and Ischemic Colitis and Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysm (often manifested in the unlikely “dissecting aneurysm”).
(more…)

By |2017-11-06T18:51:53-08:00Jan 4, 2011|Medical Education|

Trick of the Trade: Self-Reflection

 

Selfreflection

After a shift, we often review the day’s case with our learners. We sometimes ask them to self-reflect.

I often used Demian’s ‘Plus/Delta’ approach and ask ‘What did you like /what would you change?’

This approach works well mostly. But, when the answer is ‘I don’t think I would change anything’, it is hard to target teaching and feedback to the learner’s need.

(more…)

By |2016-11-11T19:00:17-08:00Dec 8, 2010|Medical Education, Tricks of the Trade|

Article review: Consensus methodologies in qualitative research

Strength in Numbers

What types of methodologies are used to develop a consensus statement? I’m in the midst of helping to write a consensus statement manuscript in education and ran into this great review article. It’s from the British Medical Journal in 1995. 

Basically, there are 2 general types of methodologies:

  • Delphi Process
  • Nominal Group Technique 

(more…)

By |2016-11-11T19:00:18-08:00Dec 6, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: Coaching in emergency medicine

 

After a chaotic shift, you and your learner sit down to complete the daily evaluation card. There are no significant issues with the learner. Is there anything else to write except ‘great shift’ or ‘read more’?

Can we learn from excellent motivators such as sports coaches? This article by LeBlanc and Sherbino outlines coaching as a teaching technique in the ED.

(more…)

By |2016-10-26T17:05:27-07:00Nov 22, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|
Go to Top