New kid on the block: Univ of Washington EM residency

How awesome would it be if there were EM residency programs at the University of Washington and UCSF-SF General Hospital?!

This has been the question for decades. In 2006, I had the pleasure of seeing the UCSF-SFGH program become a reality. And now it’s the University of Washington’s turn. It is close to becoming a reality. It is really one of the last powerhouse institutions which does not have an EM residency program.

The Univ of Washington EM residency’s Program Director is helmed by my superstar friend, Dr. Fiona Gallahue, and will be a 4-year program. The ACGME (accrediting organization) has already site-visited the program. Short of an unforeseen snafu, I can’t imagine that it won’t be approved for a start year of 2011-12. The program will find out the official answer on February 14, 2011.

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By |2017-03-05T14:18:35-08:00Nov 2, 2010|Medical Education|

Article review: Feedback in the Emergency Department

FeedbackFeedback is important in teaching and learning.

I am constantly surprised by medical student and resident comments that they rarely receive feedback. In contrast, seemingly on every shift, I hear faculty giving little nuggets of feedback – during the oral presentation, during the resuscitation, after a difficult interaction, etc. There must be some disconnect.

This multi-institutional, survey-based, observational study at 17 EM residency programs asked attending physicians and residents about feedback in the ED. The primary outcome measure was overall satisfaction with feedback.

Results

The response rate was 71% for attendings (373/525) and 60% for residents (356/596). Side note: Survey studies are generally inconclusive if response rates are

There was a statistically significant difference between the feedback satisfaction scores (on scale of 1-10 with 10 being highest satisfaction).

  • Attending physicians: 5.97
  • Resident physicians: 5.29

Furthermore, when evaluating the quality of different aspects of feedback delivery, there were statistically significant differences in the satisfaction ratings between the attendings and residents. Overall, attendings felt more satisfied with feedback delivery on various topics than residents were.

  • Quality of positive feedback (50% attendings, 36% residents)
  • ” of constructive feedback (29% attendings, 22% residents)
  • ” of feedback re: procedural skills (48% attendings, 34% residents)
  • ” of documentation (36% attendings, 28% residents)
  • ” of ED flow management (29% attendings, 21% residents)
  • ” of evidence-based decision making (28% attendings, 18% residents)

What is more interesting to me is the discrepancy between what the attendings and residents perceived in frequency of feedback. Specifically, 42% of attendings stated that feedback delivery was being done on every shift. Contrast this to only 7% of residents who felt the same. Why the disconnect? Is it purely misperception?

In re-reading this article, I wonder how this question was phrased though. Was it indeed perception or fact?

Let’s say there are usually 5 residents per attending shift, and the attending gives feedback every shift to at least 1 person. When surveyed, the attending would answer – “Yes, I give daily feedback”. In contrast, because there are multiple learners, residents may not have received daily feedback. By law of averages, residents would have received feedback every 5 shifts.

The data showing that 42% of attendings and 7% of residents were involved in feedback delivery every shift may actually be true (rather than pure perception). This illustrates the trickiness of designing and writing surveys.

Bottom Line

We should be working to improve positive and constructive feedback delivery in the Emergency Department, despite the various obstacles.

Reference
Yarris L, et al. Attending and resident satisfaction with feedback in the emergency department. Acad Emerg Med. 2009; 16:S76–S8.

Also see previous post on Failing at Feedback in Medical Education.

 

By |2016-11-25T15:43:29-08:00Jan 18, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: Conference attendance ≠ better test scores

AppleUniqueNot all learners should be expected to have the same learning style.

This is exemplified in a recent multicenter study, which addresses whether attendance at weekly residency conferences correlates with a better in-service training examination (ITE) score. The ITE score was used as an outcome measure, because it correlates with the resident’s likelihood for passing the official ABEM Board Exams. Both tests draw from questions in the Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine.

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By |2019-02-19T18:59:55-08:00Jan 11, 2010|Medical Education|

Article review: Service versus education

ERwaitingroomIt’s a busy day in the Emergency Department and there are 5 new patients to be seen. The waiting room is overflowing. As the attending, you are getting barraged with a million questions to answer and problems to fix.

There is also a case of a full-thickness burn patient going to the OR in the next few minutes. She’d be a perfect teaching case for the residents.

Should I have the residents go see the new patients, or should I pull them all aside to show them the physical findings and teach about burns for 5-10 minutes?
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By |2016-11-11T19:01:45-08:00Jan 4, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article Review: Hidden cost of reducing resident duty hours

Patient care versus education

This is the tug-of-war struggle that residency programs constantly grapple with. Residents work in an apprenticeship model where they are both patient providers and learners. Both are critical in residency training, but they sometimes negatively impact each other. For instance, EM residents hand-off their patients to covering residents while attending their weekly conference classes. In contrast, residents may skip that day’s board teaching rounds to manage an acutely decompensating patient.

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By |2013-06-15T18:29:04-07:00Nov 30, 2009|Education Articles, Medical Education|