What makes a good clinical educator?

apple ExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200In this constantly evolving world of learner competencies, assessments, and milestones often is forgotten the important role of clinical teachers. We can all remember clinical instructors that stand out despite the grueling years of medical school and residency training. We admired them for various reasons and remember the insights and teaching pearls they bestowed upon us. But what exactly were the qualities that they possessed that other instructors did not have? What exactly did they have that made them a good clinical teacher in medicine?

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MEdIC Series: The Case of the Culture Clash: Expert Review and Curated Commentary

Culture ClashThe Case of the Culture Clash presented a conflict within a multi-cultural team of doctors. Mary, a registrar was unable to effectively teach all her interns, who had diverse personal and professional backgrounds. Working in teams with many cultural and linguistic difficulties is becoming more and more common worldwide. This month we asked about personal experiences of difficulties with multi-cultural teams, how to overcome these difficulties, and how we as educators can improve our teaching of learners from different backgrounds.

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MEdIC Series: The Case of the Terrible Teammate: Expert Review and Curated Commentary

fingerThe Case of the Terrible Teammate presented a conflict between a team of chief residents. Sarah got upset because David seemed to be shirking his responsibilities and getting her to do all of the work. While we provided a specific context for the case, interpersonal disagreements over the distribution of work may come up in any work arrangement that splits responsibility between two or more parties. When it does, how should we deal with it? This month Dr. Teresa Chan (@TChanMD) and I (@Brent_Thoma) explored this issue with insights from the ALiEM community and 3 experts.

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Pitfalls in Comparative Simulation Based Research

SimExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200Simulation based research is tough. We all know that it’s fun, and we think it is safer for the patients. Beyond that, the data is not so strong! And it’s important to care about this. Why? Because those working in the educational fields are fighting for budgets against other strong modalities for education such as ultrasound. Additionally, we are fighting for valuable time and space with the learners, such as medical students and residents. Improving simulation research can give credibility to those educators who seek more money, time, and focus for their learners. But how to improve it?

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MEdIC Series: The Case of the Magnificent Mentor – Expert and Community Response

Thank you pictureThe Case of the Magnificent Mentor outlined a common dilemma that is likely to occur with most protégés: How does one thanks his/her mentor for all their help over the years?  During this time of the year, as we look towards a new year, Brent Thoma (@Brent_Thoma) and I (@Teresa Chan) thought we would engage our readership in a bit of reflection about those who have got us to where we are today. (NB from TC & BT:  And yes, we know, this is 100% cheesy and holiday fluff – but we felt like doing something a bit more in keeping with the holiday spirit.

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Thank You ALiEM Expert Peer Reviewers

ExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200We would like to take this opportunity to thank those of you who took the time to take part in our exciting new Expert Peer Review series over the last 4 months of 2013.  Your contributions helped us roll out this ground breaking process, and we hope you all will continue to contribute to our peer review in the future. 

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MEdIC: The Case of the Facebook Faceplant – Expert and Community Response

computerOn September 27th we posted the second case of the MEdIC (Medical Education In Cases) series facilitated by Dr. Brent Thoma (@BoringEM) and me (@TChanMD). The Case of the Facebook Faceplant involved a “resident at risk” who lashed out on Facebook about an experience with a nurse. Our readers were thrust into the role of a supervising attending physician who sees the post. Once again, we were overwhelmed by the number and quality of responses in the comments and on Twitter.

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