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6 10, 2014

Top 10 Reasons NOT to Order a CT Pan Scan in a Stable Blunt Trauma Patient

2017-03-05T14:18:47+00:00

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The pendulum has swung one way with CT for trauma, but has it gone too far? Liberal use of CT raises concerns over resource utilization, cost, and the consequences of radiation exposure [1,2]. No-one can seem to agree, including trauma surgeons, on guidelines for a more selective use of imaging studies [3-6].

“CT pan scan” is the term, source unclear, which describes the whole body CT (WBCT) imaging strategy used in blunt trauma management. It consists of the following CT studies:

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18 09, 2014

Vomiting in Kids After Head Trauma: To CT or Not to CT?

2016-12-16T12:06:29+00:00

figure_sick_by_toilet_12153A 6-year-old male is brought to the emergency department (ED) after falling from the monkey bars at a local playground. Physical examination reveals no scalp hematoma, and the child appears alert and well oriented. You decide to observe him over the next 30 minutes hours to determine if he develops any disconcerting symptoms. After 15 minutes of observation within the ED the patient has an episode of vomiting witnessed by the nurses. The patient’s mother wants to know if this means he has failed his observation period and needs to receive a head CT. Your answer? (more…)

16 08, 2014

Trick of the Trade: V-to-Y flap laceration repair for tension wounds

2016-11-11T19:22:28+00:00

Laceration repairYou see a patient with a large V-shaped laceration under tension requiring suture repair. Resist the temptation to simply pull the edges together and close the laceration with simple interrupted or running sutures. Excessive tension on a flap edge during the healing process can compromise its blood supply. This causes ischemia to the healing tissue, which in turn makes that flap edge more likely to dehisce, necrose, and become infected.

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26 05, 2014

Trick of the Trade: Nail Bed Repair With Tissue Adhesive Glue

2019-02-05T07:21:10+00:00
Nail Bed Repair

Patients with fingertip injuries involving the nail bed typically present to the emergency department and require meticulous repair of the nail bed to prevent long-term cosmetic and functional disability. There are several methods to repair nail beds, typically involving absorbable suture, but maybe there is a faster way with similar cosmetic and functional outcomes. 

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19 03, 2014

Trick of the Trade: Parting the hair for scalp laceration repair

2016-11-11T19:19:43+00:00

scalp laceration 1Trying to suture or staple a scalp laceration is oftentimes a hairy proposition for emergency physicians who repair these types of wounds regularly. Although the “hair apposition technique” method is one option, if one opts for sutures or staples, the most difficult part of the procedure is trying to avoid trapping hair strands within the wound, which may cause wound dehiscense, a foreign body reaction, or a local infection. 

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17 03, 2014

Article: Elevated INR May Overestimate Coagulopathy in Trauma and Surgical Patients

2016-11-11T19:19:39+00:00

FFPA 55 year old woman presents as the driver of a motor vehicle collision. She has moderate abdominal tenderness diffusely and a seat belt sign, but has a negative abdominal/pelvis CT. Her INR, however, was noted to be 2.1. She is not on any vitamin K antagonists. The surgeons admit her to the hospital to observe for a potential hollow viscus injury and requests that you order 2 units of FFP for her. Seems reasonable… or is it? What is the logic?

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23 01, 2014

Head injury in pediatric patients: To CT or not to CT?

2017-03-05T14:14:36+00:00

EpiduralHemorrhageExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200Intracranial injury is the leading cause of death and disability in children. It can arise after severe, moderate, or minor head injury. Children with minor head injury present the greatest diagnostic dilemma for emergency physicians, as they appear well but a small number will develop intracranial injuries. The question that often arises in the ED is:

To CT or not to CT?

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