IDEA Series: Homemade Escharotomy Kit

Normal knee radiology AP

Although escharotomy is rarely performed by emergency physicians during the initial management of burns, it is a life and limb-sparing skill important to know as a trainee and provider in emergency medicine [1,2]. There are few models made to accommodate procedural training, and the ones available are often cost-prohibitive. It is critical to have a method for learning and practicing this important procedure [3,4].

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By |2020-07-03T15:50:13-07:00Jul 6, 2020|IDEA series, Trauma|

EMRad: Radiologic Approach to the Traumatic Knee

Radiology teaching during medical school is variable, ranging from informal teaching to required clerkships [1].​​ Many of us likely received an approach to a chest x-ray, but approaches to other studies may or may not have not been taught. We can do better! Enter EM:Rad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. We recently covered the elbow, wrist, shoulder, ankle, and foot. Next up: the knee.

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By |2020-06-24T07:34:48-07:00Jun 29, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Can’t Miss Adult Knee Injuries

knee radiology

Figure 1: Normal AP knee x-ray. Case courtesy of Dr Andrew Dixon, Radiopaedia.org, annotations by Stephen Villa MD.

Have you ever been working a shift at 3am and wondered, “Am I missing something? I’ll just splint and instruct the patient to follow up with their PCP in 1 week.” This is a reasonable approach, especially if you’re concerned there could be a fracture. But we can do better. Enter the “Can’t Miss” series: a series organized by body part that will help identify injuries that ideally should not be missed. This list is not meant to be a comprehensive review of each body part, but rather to highlight and improve your sensitivity for these potentially catastrophic injuries. Now: the knee.

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By |2020-06-24T07:43:05-07:00Jun 29, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Can’t Miss Adult Shoulder Injuries

AP view shoulder

Have you ever been working a shift at 3 am and wondered, “Am I missing something? I’ll just splint and instruct the patient to follow up with their primary doctor in 1 week.” This is a reasonable approach, especially if you’re concerned there could be a fracture. But we can do better. Enter the “Can’t Miss” series: a series organized by body part that will help identify injuries that ideally should not be missed. This list is not meant to be a comprehensive review of each body part, but rather aims to highlight and improve your sensitivity for these potentially catastrophic injuries. Now: the shoulder

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By |2020-05-14T22:35:01-07:00May 6, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Radiologic Approach to the Traumatic Shoulder

Normal-shoulder series

This is EMRad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department [1]. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific  to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. We have already covered the elbow, the wrist, and the foot and ankle. Next up: the shoulder.

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By |2020-05-14T22:35:10-07:00May 6, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

IDEA series: The Bleeding Arm Tourniquet Simulation

Tourniquet simulation

Education in emergency response to trauma is a global health priority [1]. Mortality rates are nearly twice as high in patients with trauma in low-income as compared to high-income countries [2]. With uncontrolled bleeding as the number one cause of death from trauma, tourniquet application has been the focus of training programs, like the “Stop the Bleed” campaign in the United States [3]. Although understanding how to apply a tourniquet is a life-saving intervention, use of a windlass tourniquet may not be intuitive [4].  The windlass tourniquet in its simplest form is the “stick-and-rope.” Winding the stick in the tourniquet creates a mechanical advantage for providing compression. Simulation of the windlass technique can be used to teach management of uncontrolled bleeding. Here we describe a low-cost simulation model that combines low- and high-fidelity techniques to train healthcare personnel on windlass tourniquet application.

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ALiEM AIR | Trauma 2020 Module

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is AIR-logo-SAEM-square-200x200.jpg

Welcome to the AIR Trauma Module! After carefully reviewing all relevant posts from the top 50 sites of the Social Media Index, the ALiEM AIR Team is proud to present the highest quality online content related to trauma emergencies. 8 blog posts within the past 12 months (as of January 2020) met our standard of online excellence and were curated and approved for residency training by the AIR Series Board. We identified 2 AIR and 6 Honorable Mentions. We recommend programs give 4 hours (about 30 minutes per article) of III credit for this module.

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