EMRad: Can’t Miss Adult Ankle and Foot Injuries

Have you ever been working at 3am and wondered, “Am I missing something? I’ll just splint and instruct the patient to follow up with their PCP in 1 week.” This is a reasonable approach, especially if you’re concerned there could be a fracture. But we can do better. Enter the “Can’t Miss” series: a series organized by body part that will help identify injuries that ideally should not be missed. This list is not meant to be a comprehensive review of each body part, but rather to highlight and improve your sensitivity for these potentially catastrophic injuries. We’ve already covered the elbow and wrist. Now: the foot and ankle.

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By |2020-03-04T09:26:41-08:00Mar 4, 2020|Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Approach to the Traumatic Foot X-ray

Radiology teaching during medical school is variable, ranging from informal teaching to required clerkships [1].​​ Many of us likely received an approach to a chest x-ray, but approaches to other studies may or may not have not been taught. We can do better! Enter EM:Rad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. We recently covered the elbow, wrist, and ankle: now, the foot x-ray.

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By |2020-03-05T09:23:45-08:00Feb 26, 2020|Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Radiologic Approach to the Traumatic Ankle

AP ankle radiographRadiology teaching during medical school is variable, ranging from informal teaching to required clerkships [1].​​ Many of us likely received an approach to a chest x-ray, but approaches to other studies may or may not have not been taught. We can do better! Enter EM:Rad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. We recently covered the elbow and wrist. Now: the ankle.

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By |2020-03-05T09:20:55-08:00Feb 24, 2020|Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

Gaining the Diagnosis of Vitreous Hemorrhage with Ultrasound

A 54 year-old male presents to the emergency department with an eye complaint. The patient works as a cook and while cleaning the grill several hours ago felt something fly into his eye. He did not immediately feel pain, but notes blurred vision and an increasing pressure-like sensation in his left eye. He describes his left-sided blurred vision as a haziness, like cobwebs over his eye. He has been able to open his eye and keep it open without difficulty.

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By |2020-01-29T15:55:48-08:00Jan 31, 2020|Ophthalmology, Ultrasound|

EMRad: Can’t Miss Adult Wrist Injuries

Have you ever been working a shift at 3 AM and wondered, “Am I missing something? I’ll just splint and instruct the patient to follow up with their PCP in 1 week.” This is a reasonable approach, especially if you’re concerned there could be a fracture. But we can do better. Enter the “Can’t Miss” series: a series organized by body part that will help identify common and catastrophic injuries. This list is not meant to be a comprehensive review of each body part, but rather to highlight and improve your sensitivity for these potentially catastrophic injuries. Last post, we reviewed the elbow. Now, the “Can’t Miss” adult wrist injuries.

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By |2019-12-15T16:20:09-08:00Jan 8, 2020|Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Radiologic Approach to the Traumatic Wrist

This is EMRad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. Last post, we focused on the elbow. Now: the wrist.

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By |2019-12-15T16:32:58-08:00Jan 8, 2020|Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

Ultrasound for the Win! 3-year-old with abdominal pain #US4TW

ultrasound for the win intussusception

A 3-year-old Hispanic female with no significant past medical or surgical history presents to the Emergency Department with her mother for a 3 day history of crampy abdominal pain, intermittent bloody diarrhea and fever. There has been no recent travel, admissions, or antibiotic use. Her older sister reports similar symptoms, which have resolved. The patient saw her pediatrician the day prior, who recommended supportive care including oral rehydration.

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By |2019-11-19T01:47:58-08:00Dec 4, 2019|Pediatrics, Ultrasound, Ultrasound for the Win|