Paucis Verbis: Brugada syndrome

Brugada SyndromeBrugada, Brugada, Brugada

You always hear about it when working up syncope and sudden cardiac arrest in young patients, but it’s so easy to forget what it looks like on ECG. We so rarely see it… or DO we?!

This Paucis Verbis card on Brugada Syndrome is to help emblazon these ECG tracings in our mind, so that we don’t miss the subtle findings which place a patient at risk for sudden cardiac death. Pay special attention to Type 1, which is most specific for Brugada Syndrome.

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2019-01-28T22:40:48-08:00

Paucis Verbis: AMI and ECG Geography

Sometimes a picture is worth MORE than a 1000 words. Such is the case of the above illustration that I saw on the Life In The Fast Lane blog. When I first saw it, I knew that I immediately had to find out who made the graphic. It turns out it is the multitalented Dr. Tor Ercleve, who is an emergency physician at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and an established medical illustrator.

20110408AMI_EKGgeography

This graphic demonstrates the EKG findings for the various types of acute MI’s as broken down by coronary vascular anatomy (right coronary artery, left circumflex artery, left anterior descending artery). This detailed illustration won’t be readable in print form but is great in digital format on your mobile device.

Thanks, Tor!

[PDF]

Go to the ALiEM Cards site for more resources.
2019-01-28T22:50:14-08:00

Paucis Verbis: Sgarbossa’s Criteria with LBBB

EKG_LBBB

It is difficult to determine if a patient with a left bundle branch block (LBBB) has an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) because ST segments are “appropriately discordant” with the terminal portion of the QRS. That means if the QRS complex is negative (or downgoing), the ST segment normally will be positive (or elevated). Similarly if the QRS complex is positive (or upgoing), the ST segment will be negative (or depressed).

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2019-01-28T23:20:04-08:00