Trick of the Trade: Splinting the ear

EarHematomaDressing

One of the hardest bandages to apply well is one for auricular hematomas. After drainage, how would you apply a bandage to prevent the re-accumulation of blood in the perichondrial space?

Traditionally, one can wedge xeroform gauze or a moistened ribbon (used for I&D’s) in the antihelical fold. Behind the ear, insert several layers of gauze, which have been slit half way to allow for easier molding around the ear. Anterior to the ear, apply several layers of gauze to complete the “ear sandwich”. Finally, secure the sandwich in place with an ACE wrap, which ends up being quite challenging because of the shape of the head.

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By |2016-11-11T19:59:20-08:00Aug 10, 2011|ENT, Trauma, Tricks of the Trade|

Trick of the Trade: Anesthetizing the nasal tract

 
ViscLidocaine

One of the most uncomfortable procedures that we do on patients is a nasogastric (NG) tube. The maximal pain comes when the NG tube has to make a right angle turn in the posterior nasopharynx. The same goes for the nasopharyngeal (NP) fiberoptic scope. There are many approaches to topical anesthesia, including using benzocaine sprays, gargling with viscous lidocaine, squirting viscous lidocaine in the nares +/- afrin spray, and nebulizing lidocaine. None, however, really apply an anesthetic directly over the most sensitive area AND test for its effectiveness.

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By |2016-11-11T18:52:40-08:00Jul 13, 2011|ENT, Tricks of the Trade|

Trick of the Trade: Temperomandibular (TMJ) dislocation

TMJdislocation.jpg

Mandible, or TMJ, dislocations occur when the patient excessively opens the mouth, such as in a yawn. They are typically bilateral and are difficult to relocate because of masseter and medial pterygoid muscle spasm. You can relocate the condyles back into the TMJ space with gentle but firm intraoral pressure inferiorly and posteriorly. Often it requires some sedation to help relax the muscles of mastication.

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By |2019-01-28T22:49:39-08:00May 4, 2011|ENT, Tricks of the Trade|

Paucis Verbis card: Croup

The most common cause of stridor in pediatric patients is croup, or laryngotracheobronchitis. The distinct high-pitched, seal-like,”barky” cough can be heard from outside the patient’s room often.

Check out the clip above that I randomly found on YouTube. Go to the 1:15 mark (near the end) to hear the barking cough. Poor but cute kid.

What is the current treatment regimen? Did you know that the traditional treatment with cool mist or humidified air have shown to be of no added benefit?

PV Card: Croup


Go to the ALiEM Cards site for more resources.

By |2019-01-28T23:25:57-08:00Aug 20, 2010|ENT, Infectious Disease, Pediatrics|

Paucis Verbis card: Strep pharyngitis

StrepHave you heard of the Modified Centor Score for strep pharyngitis? Interestingly, it has been validated in adults and children. The methodology builds on the traditional Centor Score by incorporating the patient’s age, because this disease is more prevalent in kids than adults. In fact, you actually lose a scoring point if you are older than 44 years old.

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By |2019-01-28T23:26:43-08:00Jul 30, 2010|ALiEM Cards, ENT, Pediatrics|

Trick of the Trade: A tongue blade is as mighty as an xray

Patients often present to the Emergency Department for mandibular blunt trauma. Usually these patients have soft tissue swelling at the point of impact. In mandibular body fractures, the fracture line often extends to the alevolar ridge. This may cause a gap between a pair of lower teeth.

In patients with jaw pain, mild swelling, and normal dentition, is there a way to avoid imaging these patients to rule-out a mandible fracture?

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By |2016-11-11T19:00:37-08:00Jul 21, 2010|ENT, Tricks of the Trade|
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