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About Mark Favot, MD

Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Wayne State University School of Medicine
Co-Director, Emergency Ultrasound Fellowship
Detroit Medical Center/Wayne State University
4 06, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Using Linear Transducers for Point of Care Ultrasound in Intrauterine Pregnancy Evaluation

Ultrasound Intrauterine PregnancyThe volume of women presenting to the emergency department (ED) with newly diagnosed first-trimester pregnancies and suspected ectopic pregnancies sometimes seems like an infinitely growing number. As ED physicians, proper identification of an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) in these patients is of paramount importance and the initial imaging test of choice for many has become bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS).

(more…)

4 06, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Linear Transducers for Point of Care Ultrasound in Intrauterine Pregnancy Evaluation

2017-07-19T00:05:47+00:00

Ultrasound in Intrauterine PregnancyThe volume of women presenting to the emergency department (ED) with newly diagnosed first-trimester pregnancies and suspected ectopic pregnancies sometimes seems like an infinitely growing number. As ED physicians, proper identification of an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) in these patients is of paramount importance and the initial imaging test of choice for many has become bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS).

(more…)

4 06, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Using Linear Transducers for Point of Care Ultrasound in Pregnancy Evaluation

2017-06-04T21:05:28+00:00

Ultrasound Intrauterine PregnancyThe volume of women presenting to the emergency department (ED) with newly diagnosed first-trimester pregnancies and suspected ectopic pregnancies sometimes seems like an infinitely growing number. As ED physicians, proper identification of an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) in these patients is of paramount importance and the initial imaging test of choice for many has become bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS).

(more…)

2 03, 2015

Ultrasound for Verification of Endotracheal Tube Location

2016-11-18T10:10:26+00:00

ETT LubricateIn patients undergoing emergent tracheal intubation, there is currently no universally accepted gold-standard test to confirm the location of the endotracheal tube (ETT).1 End-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) detection is the best of the tests that are routinely utilized to confirm ETT placement, however, it has been shown to have an error rate as high as 1/10 for proper determination of ETT location in emergency intubations.2 As a result, multiple modalities are necessary to confirm ETT location, which can delay mechanical ventilation and other treatments. The lack of a single, reliable test to confirm ETT placement can potentially lead to confusion regarding the location of the tube. This confusion can result in both unrecognized esophageal intubations (“false positive”), as well as successful tracheal intubations that are subsequently removed (“false negative”), subjecting the patient to further unnecessary attempts at airway management. Both scenarios can lead to disastrous consequences.

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