EMRad: Approach to the Traumatic Foot X-ray

Radiology teaching during medical school is variable, ranging from informal teaching to required clerkships [1].​​ Many of us likely received an approach to a chest x-ray, but approaches to other studies may or may not have not been taught. We can do better! Enter EM:Rad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. We recently covered the elbow, wrist, and ankle: now, the foot x-ray.

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By |2020-05-14T22:36:00-07:00Feb 26, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Radiologic Approach to the Traumatic Ankle

AP ankle radiographRadiology teaching during medical school is variable, ranging from informal teaching to required clerkships [1].​​ Many of us likely received an approach to a chest x-ray, but approaches to other studies may or may not have not been taught. We can do better! Enter EM:Rad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. We recently covered the elbow and wrist. Now: the ankle.

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By |2020-05-14T22:36:09-07:00Feb 24, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

SplintER: Knee pain after the jump

tibial tubercle fracturesA 15 year-old male presents to the emergency department with left knee pain and swelling after jumping while attempting to dunk a basketball. You obtain a knee x-ray (image 1 courtesy of Mark Hopkins, MD). What is your diagnosis? What patient population is at risk for this injury? What other injuries occur in this anatomical location? What is your emergency department management?

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SplintER Series: Two cases of shoulder pain

 

Two patients present to your emergency department: Patient 1 is a 17 year-old soccer player who fell during a game onto their right side and is now complaining of mild right shoulder pain. You obtain x-rays (Figure 1). Patient 2 is a 21 year-old motorist who lost control and went over the handlebars. They heard a pop and are complaining of left shoulder pain. You obtain shoulder x-rays (Figure 2). For these cases, what are your diagnoses, expected physical examination findings, and emergency department management?

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By |2020-02-04T19:13:23-08:00Feb 5, 2020|Emergency Medicine, Orthopedic, SplintER|

SplintER Series: The Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation

Bankart Lesion

 

A 17 year-old football player with prior shoulder dislocation presents to the emergency department reporting shoulder pain after fall. You obtain shoulder x-rays and see the following injury (Image courtesy of Richard Hopkins, MD).

What is your diagnosis? Are there any associated lesions you could expect to find? What is your emergency department management?

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EMRad: Can’t Miss Adult Wrist Injuries

Have you ever been working a shift at 3 AM and wondered, “Am I missing something? I’ll just splint and instruct the patient to follow up with their PCP in 1 week.” This is a reasonable approach, especially if you’re concerned there could be a fracture. But we can do better. Enter the “Can’t Miss” series: a series organized by body part that will help identify common and catastrophic injuries. This list is not meant to be a comprehensive review of each body part, but rather to highlight and improve your sensitivity for these potentially catastrophic injuries. Last post, we reviewed the elbow. Now, the “Can’t Miss” adult wrist injuries.

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By |2020-05-14T22:36:19-07:00Jan 8, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

EMRad: Radiologic Approach to the Traumatic Wrist

This is EMRad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. Last post, we focused on the elbow. Now: the wrist.

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By |2020-05-14T22:36:28-07:00Jan 8, 2020|EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|
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