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1 11, 2015

8 Tips On How To Run An Awesome Works-in-Progress Meeting

Work in progress canstockphoto25743758Do you have 27 projects up in the air but none of them submitted for publication yet? (Guilty!) Have a great project in the works but can’t get past one sticky detail? (Been there!) Need help navigating a finicky IRB? (Yuck!) CV just looking a little threadbare? (Hangs head in shame.) You need a Works-in-Progress (WIP) meeting!

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14 05, 2015

Dear Residents: 10 Things Your New Chiefs Want You to Know

2018-10-28T21:23:33+00:00

Need to Know canstockphoto13987731 This month starts our inaugural ALiEM Chief Resident Incubator and this post is the culmination of a 7-day intensive writing project by our 100+ Chief Residents. Incredibly we were impressed by the caliber of writing and insightfulness of our members. Congratulations especially to the lead editors, Dr. Melissa Joseph (LAC+USC) and Dr. Jimmy Lindsey (Univ of Chicago). Looking forward to an exciting year ahead of us!

10 Things Your New Chiefs Want You to Know

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3 04, 2015

MEdIC Series | The Case of the Financial Fiasco – Expert Review and Curated Commentary

2018-10-28T21:23:28+00:00

The Case of the Financial Fiasco has stimulated interesting  discussion over the past week. We are now proud to present to you the Curated Community Commentary and our two expert opinions. Thank-you again to all our experts and participants for contributing again this week to the ALiEM MEdIC series.

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5 06, 2014

Research Figures Demystified: Bland-Altman Plot

Charts-Scatter-plot-iconPrepublication-and-ExpertPeerReviewWhile working your shift in a small community ED, you overhear that EMS is on their way to you with a five-year-old child in respiratory distress after eating a peanut butter sandwich. Anticipating the patient to be in anaphylactic shock, you and the senior resident begin planning the course of action. The resident asks, “how much do you think a five-year-old weighs?” While you begin fumbling for your Broselow tape, a nurse seated near you confidently responds, “That’s easy, just count your fingers! One, three, five. Ten, fifteen, twenty! The child weighs approximately twenty kilograms!”.

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24 05, 2014

Assessment in medical education: Finding the signal in the noise

A MinusThis past December it was reported in the Harvard Crimson that the median grade at their prestigious University was an A-.1 A flood of articles followed bemoaning grade inflation at educational institutions with a former Harvard President noting cheekily that “the most unique honor you could graduate with was none”.2 This might be alright if well-developed criterion-based instruments are used to grade the students, but given the variability in courses taught at the University and difficulty of developing such tools, it is unlikely. That being the case, if the median is an A-, one wonders how sub-par performance must be to fail.

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17 05, 2014

Improving debriefing skills: Two-column case and learning pathways grid

250px-teammeeting1ExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200Being a learner in a medical simulation case can be tough. But equally challenging, is the role of the Debriefer. This person has to balance the important task of debriefing the small group, provide feedback, and still maintain a positive and open learning environment. A 2013 paper by Rudolph et al attempts to show methods how to balance these demands while improving as a Debriefer through the use of 2 Column Case Analysis and Learning Pathway Grid.

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1 05, 2014

What makes a good clinical educator?

apple ExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200In this constantly evolving world of learner competencies, assessments, and milestones often is forgotten the important role of clinical teachers. We can all remember clinical instructors that stand out despite the grueling years of medical school and residency training. We admired them for various reasons and remember the insights and teaching pearls they bestowed upon us. But what exactly were the qualities that they possessed that other instructors did not have? What exactly did they have that made them a good clinical teacher in medicine?

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