Vote which Annals of EM articles to be open-access in April

By |Jan 8, 2014|Categories: Social Media & Tech|Tags: |

For many years, Annals of Emergency Medicine has selected two articles every month to make open access to non-subscribers, based on their perceived interest and/or importance. Problem is, we make those choices blind to what our readers really want. You can help us improve this selection if you would review the list of articles that will be in the April 2014 issue, and vote for any articles you’d like to see free full-text. Please vote on your top two choices over the next 2 days and we’ll make them full text open access shortly thereafter. The in-press titles and abstracts are listed [...]

ALiEM Bookclub: Hanging Out with author Sheri Fink

By |Dec 21, 2013|Categories: Book Club, Social Media & Tech|

This past week, we’ve hosted a discussion for our book club on “Five Days at Memorial”. First off, thank-you to everyone who has contributed!  But now we have a special surprise. Two months ago we had Shawn Achor tweeting with us… and now we have a Google Hangout On Air with Sheri Fink MD PhD (@SheriFink), the author of the ALiEM Book Club selection this month!  Not only is Sheri an award winning journalist, who has written an amazing book – she’s also a really nice lady who was happy to chat with us for 40 minutes about her latest work [...]

Policy Change: A Brief Primer for Emergency Physicians

By |Dec 17, 2013|Categories: Public Health|

Like it or not, many things that determine our daily satisfaction with our work are determined by policy. QI measures, the implementation of EMRs, the availability of cigarettes, the funding of GME positions, the strength of drunk driving laws, the availability of mental health care: these are all legislative decisions, with an intimate relationship to our work. Yet, only half of the practicing physicians in the U.S. report that they are actively involved in policy change/advocacy. […]

Child Whisperer Series: There’s an app for that!

By |Dec 9, 2013|Categories: Pediatrics, Social Media & Tech|

I was playing bubbles with a 2 yr old when she wanted a turn. Even though I knew the outcome, she said “peeeze” so I said OK. As predicted, she immediately dumped the bubbles on the floor and started laughing. In the corner of the room I heard the quiet voice of her 10 year old brother say to me, “Excuse me, ma’am… you know there’s an app for that”.   […]

Social Media Index: Controversy and Evolution

By |Nov 24, 2013|Categories: Social Media & Tech|Tags: |

The Social Media Index was moved from BoringEM to ALiEM on the morning of Thursday, November 21st. The increased exposure for my previously obscure little prototype got it a lot of attention. By that afternoon Dr. Scott Weingart (@EMCrit) had weighed in with an audio response critical of the index and requested that EMCrit be removed. This set off a lively discussion on Twitter as a good chunk of the FOAM community got in on this important discussion. […]

Lessons Learned from an Impromptu Twitter Consensus Conference on Blog Design

By |Nov 24, 2013|Categories: Social Media & Tech|

Written jointly by Teresa Chan & Tessa Davis (Guest writer from “DontForgetTheBubbles.com”) A Brief Background: It seemed like an average Thursday at first. But then, on November 21 (November 22 to some in Australia) controversy struck our little online #FOAMed world. With the launch of the Social Media Index on the ALiEM website, something had existed for almost six months at BoringEM.org suddenly became a point of contention. […]

Social Media Index (SM-i) on ALiEM

By |Nov 21, 2013|Categories: Social Media & Tech|

The Social Media Index (SM-i) started with a pilot on BoringEM. The rationale for the experiment was that the health care professionals creating Free Open-Access Medical Education (FOAM) resources had no way to measure their impact in the way that scholars (h-index) and journals (Impact Factor) do. This made it difficult for them to quantify the impact of their work and for the consumers of FOAM to distinguish between reputable and unproven websites. While I am aware of the many imperfections of the index as it now stands, I believe the pilot demonstrated that there is enough value in the concept to justify [...]

Peer Violence: A Public Health Perspective

By |Nov 7, 2013|Categories: Public Health|

Think back to your last shift. How many of you saw someone whose chief complaint was “assault”? What did you do for the patient? If you’re like most of us, you ruled out acute life-threatening injuries, sighed loudly (especially if the person had been in the ED before for other fight-related injuries), and dispo’ed. But do you ever wonder if you should do more? Or why? […]