Article Review: Evaluating students using RIME method

GradeHow do evaluate medical students and residents, who are rotating through your Emergency Department? Do you have a structured framework for assessing their competencies?

Have you heard of the RIME method of evaluating learners on their clinical rotation? Dr. Lou Pangaro (Vice Chair for Educational Programs in the Dept of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University) published a landmark article in 1999 on his simple yet effective approach in evaluating medical students and residents. I had the pleasure of briefly meeting Dr. Pangaro when he gave CDEM’s keynote speech in 2008. 

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By |2016-11-11T21:41:13-08:00Jun 28, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: Preparing for clinical clerkships during medical school

TurtleScaredsmDo you remember the sheer terror you felt, when you first started your medical school clinical rotations? Your first two years were probably spent in classrooms and small-group labs discussing anatomy, pharmacology, pathology, etc.

Then BAM! You are thrown into the deep end of the pool. You are now on a clinical team of medical professionals taking care of actual patients!

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:26-08:00Apr 5, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: SAEM Tests

SAEMlogoThis is is a great look back at how SAEM Tests were developed and now used by EM clerkships across the country. Because EM does not have a National Board of Medical Examiners shelf exam, a tremendous effort was made by the authors to create a set of validated questions for clerkship directors to use.

Specifically point serial correlation coefficients (range -1 to +1) were calculated for each question. A high coefficient means a high correlation between the performance on the individual test question and the performance on the overall test. After rewriting 25% of the test questions because of poor correlation coefficients, all current test questions now have a point serial correlation coefficient >0.2. (more…)

By |2016-11-11T18:43:23-08:00Mar 1, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Top 10 tips when making your rank list

MakingList“How do I decide how to order the residency programs on my rank list?”

On Feb 24, 2010, every residency applicant will have a brief moment of panic as their rank list is submitted and officially certified.

Next week, I’ll be joining a group podcast with Dr. Rob Rogers (Maryland) and Dr. Dave Manthey (Wake Forest) for the next installment of EMRAcast. This new podcast series was created by Rob for EMRA for the specific purpose of providing advice to medical students. I still find it fascinating how much you can get done virtually. We’ll all be using Skype from our respective offices and recording our conversation.

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By |2019-02-19T18:08:25-08:00Jan 5, 2010|Medical Education|

Trick of the Trade: The defensive arts against pimping

laughingThanks to Dr. Rob Roger’s podcast on EM-RAP Educator’s Edition series, I learned of one of the funniest publications EVER in a medical journal. It was published on April 1, 2009 in JAMA. The article focuses on teaching medical students the essential skill set– how to survive “pimping”.

Pimping traditionally occurs when an attending physician poses a difficult question to a learner in a public forum, such as board rounds or in the operating room. As a student or resident, you know that this will happen during your training, and you should be prepared. If you think of pimping as a form of battle, you will need a good defense, and you should mix it up to be successful.

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:51-08:00Nov 18, 2009|Medical Education, Tricks of the Trade|

Article review: Optimal training during fourth year of medical school

U.S. medical students traditionally spend the first 3 years of training in a pre-determined curriculum. In their 4th year, however, students have significant flexibility in how they tailor their time. For this last year before residency, they shift from a learner-centered curriculum to a patient-centered curriculum. There is a shift in mentality from “I am here to learn as much as I can about medicine” to more of a “How do I best prepare myself for working in a hospital in my chosen specialty?”

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By |2016-10-26T17:05:41-07:00Oct 12, 2009|Education Articles, Medical Education|