New kid on the block: Univ of Washington EM residency

How awesome would it be if there were EM residency programs at the University of Washington and UCSF-SF General Hospital?!

This has been the question for decades. In 2006, I had the pleasure of seeing the UCSF-SFGH program become a reality. And now it’s the University of Washington’s turn. It is close to becoming a reality. It is really one of the last powerhouse institutions which does not have an EM residency program.

The Univ of Washington EM residency’s Program Director is helmed by my superstar friend, Dr. Fiona Gallahue, and will be a 4-year program. The ACGME (accrediting organization) has already site-visited the program. Short of an unforeseen snafu, I can’t imagine that it won’t be approved for a start year of 2011-12. The program will find out the official answer on February 14, 2011.

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By |2017-03-05T14:18:35-08:00Nov 2, 2010|Medical Education|

Article review: Inaccuracy in the SLOR

InterviewResidency interview season is quickly approaching!

Unique to the field of EM, letters of recommendations from EM faculty are written on a standardized form. The Standardized Letter of Recommendation (SLOR), downloadable from the CORD website, documents information about the student’s performance in the EM clerkship, qualifications, and global assessment. At the end, the letter writer can provide free-text written comments.

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By |2019-01-28T23:20:54-08:00Nov 1, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Opportunity for med students: SAEM meeting in Boston (Jun 1-5, 2011)

 
SAEMlogo

The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) holds its annual meeting at various U.S. metropolitan cities. This year, it is going to be at Boston in June 1-5, 2011.

It is a terrific conference for medical students and residents interested in EM academia. To help coordinate the huge meeting, the SAEM Program Committee is looking for 15 enthusiastic medical students to serve as volunteers.
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By |2016-11-11T18:43:23-08:00Oct 28, 2010|Medical Education|

Article review: Importance of first clinical clerkship

GraysAnatomyWhat was your first clinical clerkship rotation?

Oddly, I started my third year with a sub-internship rotation on the Burn/Plastics service as my first rotation. Not sure how that happened… I managed my own patients like a 4th year student, did lots of wound care, and even got to harvest a few skin grafts. It was trial by fire.

In a recent JAMA article, 3rd year medical students who started their clinical experiences in an Internal Medicine rotation overall did better on overall clerkship grades, when compared those who started their rotations on the Ob/Gyn, Psychiatry, or Family Medicine service.

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By |2016-11-11T19:00:25-08:00Oct 4, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article Review: Student documentation in the chart

MedicalRecord

Do you have medical students rotating in your Emergency Department? Are they allowed to document in the medical record?

Charting in the medical record is the cornerstone of clinical communication. You document your findings, your clinical reasoning, and management plan. The medical record allows communication amongst providers. Chart documentation is a crucial skill that every medical student should know, as stated by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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By |2016-11-11T19:00:30-08:00Sep 6, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article Review: Rethinking the premed requirements

PremedThink back to your college years. Remember those premed courses that you had to take? Biology, chemistry, physics… oh my. How helpful were these in your preparation for medical school and clinical practice?

In 1981, the Association of American Medical Colleges assembled a group, the General Professional Education of the Physician and College Preparation for Medicine (GPEP) to relook at these premed requirements. In 1984, the published a report “Physicians for the Twenty-First Century”. They advocated that the intensive premed requirements overly skews students’ education towards a “narrow objective of medical school admission”. Education is not balanced to include broader liberal arts learning, which may teach students more about humanistic values and communication skills. 

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By |2016-11-11T19:00:31-08:00Aug 30, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|