ALiEM Bookclub: The Checklist Manifesto

Introduction

Checklists have now almost become status quo in current medicine.  My earliest encounter with the surgical checklist phenomenon was during PGY1 as an off-service intern. At this point, early adopters were running around with “Checkmark” safety-pins on their surgical caps, trying to encourage everyone to take up the cause. There were jokes and exasperated sighs each time a case started, but most complied with the task at the behest of opinion leaders (often the senior OR nurses in the room). Two years later I returned to see a culture change. OR teams seemed to communicate better, things seemed to flow.

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By |2016-11-11T19:02:41-08:00Aug 9, 2013|Book Club, Medical Education|

NPR Ted Talks: A non-medical podcast ready to inspire

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Most of us have heard of TED talks and most of us have heard of NPR. But did you know that the two have paired together to give a fascinating weekly radio discussion? Since March 2013, NPR reporter and radio host Guy Raz (@NPRGuyRaz) has brought together innovators, leaders, and entrepreneurs among others to the radio format to inspire and enlighten the listener. This amazing free resource is a valuable non-medical podcast for doctors to access.

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By |2018-01-30T02:14:40-08:00Jul 26, 2013|Medical Education, Social Media & Tech|

ALiEM Book Club: THE CHECKLIST MANIFESTO – Join the conversation

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New Horizons

Do you like the ALiEM Book Club?  Well we like you too!…  so much so that we want YOU to join in on the next book discussion! We are taking the blog and book club to another level by pairing up with Dr. Teresa Chan (@TChanMD), an academic emergentologist from Canada. We are breaking the barriers of the internet and laying the foundation for a real-time, interactive discussion utilizing social media.

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By |2016-11-16T09:37:58-08:00Jul 22, 2013|Book Club|

ALiEM Book Club: Difficult Conversations

Difficult Conversations

Debriefing is a difficult skill to acquire. It is a little to easy to ask accusatory questions when you witness things that went wrong, or in a direction not anticipated. It’s also hard when trying to keep your own horror and shock from what you just witnessed (how could you forget to get a fingerstick glucose??!!). But rarely these types of learning situations go well if we don’t learn how to develop high quality debriefing skills. Similarly without debriefing expertise, simulations that we conduct lose purpose and meaning. There are many ways to learn effective debriefing skills, and I want to share a reference that many of my simulation mentors gave me when I began building my niche in education. Reading the book “Difficult Conversations” by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project will help you gain understanding of how to approach debriefing and maximize learning in a safe environment.

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By |2016-11-11T19:02:33-08:00Jul 19, 2013|Book Club, Simulation|

Mass Casualty Anticipation – An essential, instinctual skill of EM physicians

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Emergency medicine is full of surprises, twists, and turns. We don’t know what type of patient we will encounter prior to a shift, but we are ready for any and all. That being said, preparation is essential prior to the arrival of critical patients. This is why the airway cart is checked before starting a shift or the position of the bedside ultrasound machine is always mentally tracked in order to quickly grab if needed.

Unfortunately, individual preparation is not sufficient for large scale disasters. This level of preparation must happen on a hospital and interdepartmental level such as coordination between trauma surgery, orthopedics, and emergency medicine with agreed upon policies.

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By |2016-11-11T19:02:31-08:00Jul 12, 2013|Medical Education, Trauma|

ALiEM Sim Case Series: Mass Casualty Building Bombing

disasterCase Writer:  Nikita Joshi, MD

Keywords: Mass casualty incident, building bombing, disaster, triage, ethics

Educational Objectives

Medical

  • Develop system of triage to optimize patient outcomes in prehospital disaster setting
  • Effectively utilize color coded tagging method to assist in categorizing patients
  • Develop treatment plans to address immediate emergency conditions per ATLS protocols

Communication

  • Maintain team and personnel safety precautions
  • Regularly provide updates to incident command center

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By |2019-02-19T18:08:27-08:00Jul 5, 2013|Simulation|

ALiEM Book Club: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

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Just like scores of other premedical students all striving to get acceptance to medical school, I volunteered and did research during college. I elected to work in the Virology department because I wanted to study viruses like HIV, RSV, and SARS that were causing havoc on our society. I do recall that we used HeLa cells frequently in our research. In fact, most scientists in that department used HeLa cells on a regular basis regardless of the focus of their projects. I didn’t think much of the cells and I definitely never thought of where or from whom those cells may have come from. They were simply a day to day part of my research, just like assays used for western blots. It wasn’t until I learned of the publication of the book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks [Amazon link], that I came to learn about the incredible back story of these amazing HeLa cells. I believe that this book has valuable lessons to teach us clinicians about our patients, how we relate to our patients, and the significant roles we inadvertently play in their lives.

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By |2016-11-11T19:02:21-08:00Jun 28, 2013|Book Club, Medical Education|
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