RUSH protocol: Rapid Ultrasound for Shock and Hypotension

Patients with hypotension or shock have high mortality rates, and traditional physical exam techniques can be misleading. Diagnosis and initial care must be accurate and prompt to optimize patient care. Ultrasound is ideal for the evaluation of critically ill patients in shock, and ACEP guidelines now delineate a new category of ultrasound (US)– “resuscitative.” Bedside US allows for direct visualization of pathology and differentiation of shock states.

The RUSH Protocol was first introduced in 2006 by Weingart SD et al, and later published in 2009. It was designed to be a rapid and easy to perform US protocol (<2 minutes) by most emergency physicians.

How do you perform the RUSH protocol?

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2019-09-10T13:38:55-07:00

Is it time to trash the stethoscope? The age of ultrasound

stethoscopeIs the physical exam a relic of the past, because our tools are relics of a prior era?

It is important to do and teach a thorough physical exam. I cautioned against the overreliance on diagnostic testing in lieu of a physical exam, which can be initially burdensome and prolonged. But perhaps our difficulty with the physical exam is not the exam itself, but the tools that we have at our disposal to perform an exam, rather than the exam itself.

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2018-01-30T01:59:00-08:00

Teaching internationally: More than just a language barrier

JoshiUltrasound1I recently traveled to San Salvador to help teach a pediatric and adult ultrasound course. The course was well received and it was wonderful traveling around San Salvador.

I wanted to share some of our experiences, and discuss some challenges to educating internationally. More importantly, I want to engage you, the readers to share some of your experiences when educating internationally as well.

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2016-11-11T18:43:05-08:00

Trick of the Trade: Ultrasound-guided injection for shoulder dislocation

ShoulderDislocation

Who loves relocating shoulder dislocations as much as I do? I know you do.

Often patients undergo procedural sedation in order to achieve adequate pain control and muscle relaxation. Alternatively or adjunctively, you can inject the shoulder joint with an anesthetic. Personally, I have had variable effectiveness with this technique. In cases of inadequate pain control, I always wonder if I was actually in the joint.

How can you improve your success rate in injecting into glenohumeral joint injection?

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2019-01-28T22:35:26-08:00