SAEM Clinical Image Series: Distended Abdomen after ROSC

distended abdomen

A 64-year-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) in cardiac arrest. Her family members heard her fall in the bathroom and started CPR. EMS intubated the patient and 20 minutes of CPR was done en route. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved after fifteen minutes of resuscitation in the ED.

At baseline, the patient ambulated with her walker and was conversant. She was having abdominal pain and nausea for the past three days after recently being diagnosed with a urinary tract infection. On arrival to the ED, the patient was pulseless with ventricular fibrillation. The patient received ten doses of epinephrine, two doses of sodium bicarbonate, calcium, amiodarone, magnesium, and one dose of naloxone during the resuscitation. One defibrillatory shock was administered. She was started on a norepinephrine drip and an amiodarone drip.

Computed tomography (CT) of the head was negative. CT of the chest was significant for left pneumothorax and left-sided subcutaneous emphysema. A pigtail chest tube was placed. After a few hours, she developed worsening abdominal distension. An abdominal CT scan revealed the images shown.

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SAEM Clinical Image Series: An Oropharyngeal Mass

oropharyngeal mass

A fifty-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED) unconscious with CPR in progress. Per EMS report, the patient was found down surrounded by emesis with no pulse or respirations. Fifteen minutes of CPR was performed prior to arrival in the ED with a King Tube in place. The King Tube was filled with emesis and increasingly difficult to bag. The King Tube was removed to attempt intubation and maximize oxygenation and ventilation.

When the Mac 4 blade was placed in the mouth, a large, pink, fleshy, and vascularized structure was seen in the mouth just anterior to where the uvula should have been located.  Attempts were made to compress the mass into the tongue, separate the tongue from the mass, and sweep the mass out of the way. All attempts failed to expose the epiglottis. An attempt was made to remove the mass, but it appeared to be part of the mouth.  The decision was made to proceed with a cricothyrotomy; a 6.0 tube was successfully placed, and the patient was able to be ventilated. Return of spontaneous circulation was never achieved and the patient expired in the ED.

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Unlocking the MIC-KEY: Understanding and Troubleshooting Low-Profile Gastrostomy Tubes

You are working an overnight clinical shift at your community emergency department when a worried mother brings in her 15-year-old child with cerebral palsy due to their gastric tube “coming out.” As you begin to obtain a history of the patient’s gastric tube (when it was placed, where it was placed, why is it in place, etc.) you realize you will be the one replacing it tonight, and frankly you haven’t done this before. The following post serves as a refresher on the use, placement, and complications of gastrostomy tubes.

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By |2020-08-23T17:00:00-07:00Aug 24, 2020|Emergency Medicine, Gastrointestinal|

Diagnose on Sight: Scrotal Swelling

pneumoscrotum

Case: A 58-year-old male with no past medical history presents to the emergency department for evaluation of right lower quadrant abdominal pain associated with right scrotal swelling. The patient reports that he had a colonoscopy the day before to remove a 20 mm polyp, which had been seen on an outpatient CT scan. He states that he noticed that his right scrotum appeared slightly swollen immediately away after the procedure, but since then the swelling had increased and he developed mild right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Physical examination reveals mild tenderness to the right lower quadrant and swelling of the right scrotum with palpable crepitus of the right scrotum and inguinal canal.  There is no overlying skin discoloration.  What is the most likely diagnosis?

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Trick of the Trade: Deflate an Undeflatable Gastrostomy Tube

A 54-year-old female with a past medical history of throat cancer presents for gastrostomy tube (G-tube) replacement. The initial G-tube was placed 3 years ago. Most recently, the patient had the G-tube changed 7 months ago. She presents to the Emergency Department because the G-tube is leaking from the tubing that is external to the skin. When you attempt to deflate the cuff, you are unsuccessful.

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By |2020-02-13T22:46:36-08:00Feb 19, 2020|Gastrointestinal, Tricks of the Trade|

IDEA Series: Just-in-Time Training for Diagnostic Paracentesis

AP wrist radiograph

According to the National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey, approximately 630,000 adults in the United States have cirrhosis of the liver, 69% of which are reportedly unaware of having liver disease. A diagnostic paracentesis is a simple procedure for identifying spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients with ascites. A just-in-time training (JITT) model incorporating low-fidelity equipment readily available in the ED can facilitate procedural teaching of the diagnostic paracentesis.

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By |2019-12-21T13:00:22-08:00Dec 18, 2019|Academic, Gastrointestinal, IDEA series|

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Uncommon Cause of Right Groin Pain

Amyand’s hernia CTA 48-year-old male presents with 2 weeks of severe right lower quadrant abdominal pain and inguinal pain. The patient had similar pain 2 weeks ago, was referred to a surgery clinic, but was lost to follow up. The pain has been progressively worsening over the last 2 days. It’s now severe, associated with nausea and vomiting, does not radiate, and it is worsened with coughing and sneezing. He also endorses polyuria for an unknown length of time. His last bowel movement was 3 days ago. He denies diarrhea, constipation, hematochezia, melena, dysuria, hematuria, or recent trauma.

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By |2019-12-12T21:43:29-08:00Dec 16, 2019|Gastrointestinal, SAEM Clinical Images|
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