Hot off the press: Clinical practice guideline for ketamine in the ED

Ketamine (475-10)

A 3 year old girl is brought into the ED with an abscess to her groin. Upon examination it is fluctuant and needs incision and drainage. Next door is a 5 year old boy, who fell off his bed and has an angulated radius fracture that needs reduction.

Hhhmmmm…how to manage these patients? Local anesthesia? Hematoma block? Nothing (aka brutacaine)? What about ketamine, that seems popular these days. IV? IM? With or without atropine? So many decisions!

Luckily you were surfing the internet one night and came across the 2011 clinical practice guideline on ketamine in the ED, which was just published.1

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2017-02-28T09:43:19-07:00

Paucis Verbis: Identifying toxidromes by vital signs

A middle-age woman presents to the Emergency Department with altered mental status after having ingested a drug. Is it an opioid? Is it an antihistamine?

The key is to pay close attention to the vital signs. They are often the clue to the mystery. I found this great table from EM Clinics of North America by Dr. Timothy Erickson from 2007. I can’t imagine how long it took for him to create all these mnemonics. I’ll never remember these mnemonics, but they’re fun to read nonetheless.

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2019-01-28T23:16:30-07:00

Paucis Verbis card: Procedural sedation and analgesia

picture-shark-fin-capnogramFrom time to time, our patients need moderated and deep sedation in order to tolerate painful procedures such as joint reductions or incision and drainage procedures. There are many medications available to us including some newer ones such as Ketofol and Dexmedetomidine.

This week’s Paucis Verbis is a reference card to remind us of the importance of Airway Assessment and help us calculate the medication doses.

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2017-08-03T00:37:56-07:00

Trick of the Trade: Prescribing opiates

 

PrescriptionPadAs emergency physicians, we are experts in pain control. We frequently write opiate prescriptions for patients being discharged home. Unfortunately, an occasional patient tries to forge my prescription. At times, I get a call from pharmacy for prescriptions that were suspiciously written. For instance several years ago, I had someone try to forge 100 tablets of “Mophine”.

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2016-11-11T19:00:35-07:00