Procedural Sedation Guide

Mastering procedural sedation can make your shifts safer, more efficient, and more comfortable for your patients. But what defines a sedation? What and who do I need? Does my patient need to be fasting? How should I choose and dose my medications? Below is a brief guide to help you be more confident in your definitions, preparation, and medications. Included is a guide card you can print out and clip behind your badge! Read on and be a pro for your next on-shift sedation. 

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2019-10-08T20:12:27-07:00

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Foreign Body Ingestion

foreign body ingestion

[Click for larger view]

Chief complaint: Foreign Body Ingestion

History of Present Illness:

A 4-year-old male presents to the Pediatric ED for evaluation of swallowed foreign body.

The mother reports the patient was at his grandmother’s house playing near a cabinet when they witnessed him put a small unknown object in his mouth and swallow. Family denies vomiting, difficulty breathing, change in behavior, abdominal pain, or any additional symptoms at this time.

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2019-09-03T11:18:06-07:00

PEM Pearls: 5 Tips to Demystify Amoxicillin in Pediatric Infections

Amoxicillin is a penicillin derivative antibiotic against susceptible gram positive and gram negative bacteria. It has reasonable coverage for most upper respiratory infections and is used as prophylaxis for asplenia and bacterial endocarditis. This post aims to demystify amoxicillin treatment for common pediatric infections.

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2019-09-05T17:59:37-07:00

ACMT Toxicology Visual Pearls: Mushroom Mania

mushroom poisoning amanita muscariaAfter eating the mushroom pictured, a 15-year-old patient arrives to the emergency department agitated, diaphoretic, and hallucinating, and then acutely becomes more somnolent and less responsive. Which neurotransmitter systems are affected by the toxins contained in this mushroom?

  1. Acetylcholine and histamine
  2. Dopamine and norepinephrine
  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)
  4. Glycine and serotonin

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2019-08-28T20:03:57-07:00

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Rash After a Sore Throat and Ibuprofen Use

Rash

[Click for larger view]

Chief complaint: Rash

History of Present Illness: The patient is an 18 year-old male who presents with a rash that appeared 7 days ago. The rash is located on his torso, back, and lower lip. It is pruritic. Three days prior to the appearance of the rash, he had a sore throat and intermittently took ibuprofen over the ensuing 3 days. He stopped taking ibuprofen 4 days after his sore throat abated. He denies any fever, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, chest pain, abdominal pain, diarrhea, extended travel in the past year, sick contacts, new soaps/detergents, insect bites, chemical exposure, and new foods.

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2019-07-28T21:17:29-07:00