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24 09, 2018

4 New Podcasts on the Opioid Initiative | ACEP E-QUAL Series

2018-09-23T20:49:48+00:00

ACEP EQUAL opioid use podcastsThe American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) features 3 quality improvement targets within their Emergency Quality Network (E-QUAL) initiative: sepsis, imaging, and chest pain. Most recently, they added a fourth new focus on the opioid epidemic. This opioid initiative covers best-practice approaches and strategies for managing opioid-related complications. In collaboration with ACEP E-QUAL, we have remixed and distilled 5 of their webinars into 4 podcasts.

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30 08, 2018

ACMT Toxicology Visual Pearls: Toxic Mouth Pain

2018-08-28T12:41:01+00:00

betel nut mouthA middle-aged Asian female presents to the emergency department complaining of 2-3 days of mouth pain. She has chewed betel nut for a number of years. Which of the following is true regarding her presentation and management?

  1. Debridement should be avoided.
  2. Metronidazole is contraindicated due to the potential of a disulfiram-like reaction.
  3. Oral secretagogues should be used due to the anticholinergic effects.
  4. The patient is at increased risk of oral cancer.

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10 08, 2018

Replace dolutegravir (Tivicay) with raltegravir (Isentress) for post-exposure prophylaxis

2018-08-10T04:08:00+00:00

raltegravirPost-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) of patients who may have been exposed to HIV includes a combination HIV nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor emtricitabine/tenofovir (Truvada) plus an integrase inhibitor. The CDC initially recommended the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (Tivicay). However on May 18, 2018, the CDC placed an alert about the neural tube defect risk with dolutegravir.1 How does this change our ED practice?
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11 06, 2018

The Myth of Vasopressors and Ischemia

2018-06-11T08:02:01+00:00

Despite the widespread clinical use, and their well-documented life-saving properties, vasopressors are often maligned, accused of causing ischemia to fingers, toes, mesentery, kidneys, and so forth. Not only is the evidence that this happens poor, but, a fear of this dreaded complication can unwarrantedly lead good clinicians to limit or withhold potentially life- and organ-saving medications. This article showcases the importance of end-organ perfusion and explains how vasopressors may in fact be one of the most important therapies in an emergency physician’s armamentarium.
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8 06, 2018

Trigger Point Injection for Musculoskeletal Pain in the ED

2018-06-07T20:29:26+00:00

Musculoskeletal pain is a common ED presentation and emergency providers can often manage it with NSAIDs alone.1 On the other hand, when patients present with small localized areas of intense muscle spasm called trigger points, NSAIDs won’t cut it. A trigger point injection (TPI), however, is a safe and easy way to treat the underlying cause of trigger point pain, and requires only basic equipment already available in most the EDs.

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30 05, 2018

Treating Opioid Withdrawal in the ED with Buprenorphine: A Bridge to Recovery

buprenorphineThe Emergency Department (ED) is the frontline of the opioid crisis, treating patients with opioid-related infections, opioid withdrawal, and overdose. These encounters can be difficult or even downright confrontational. But that does not have to be the case! With the use of buprenorphine, we can “flip the script” for these encounters, encouraging patient-provider collaboration in the treatment of opioid addiction as medical disease.

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