SAEM Clinical Image Series: What’s This Thing on My Face?

A 91-year-old female patient presented with her family after concern for multiple new lesions on her face and hands. The patient thinks the lesions grew over the course of a few months. There is no pain at the sites, no erythema, and no pruritis. She has caught the lesions on clothing and bedding, which has irritated the lesions on occasion, and the family is concerned/embarrassed by the growths on her face, which are harder to conceal than those on her hand.

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By |2021-02-21T07:51:46-08:00Feb 22, 2021|Academic, Dermatology, SAEM Clinical Images|

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Guess Who’s Back?

rash

A 27-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the emergency department with one week of progressively worsening, non-pruritic, and intermittently painful rash to his bilateral dorsal and plantar feet. The patient also described lesions to his left inguinal region and scrotal sac. There was no fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, or shortness of breath. The patient was sexually active with men and women, with inconsistent condom use.

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SAEM Clinical Image Series: Sun-burnt Hands and Lips

blistering

A 44-year-old Caucasian male with a past medical history of hepatitis C presents with a complaint of pain, swelling, and skin blistering of his hands. He also notes skin sores on his nose, lower lip, and the tops of his ears. The patient claims that these have become progressively worse since starting work a month ago in outdoor construction. The patient denies the use of medications or illicit drugs and denies any medical allergies. He admits to tobacco use and daily alcohol use. The patient denies any other symptoms.

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SAEM Clinical Image Series: The Insidious Rash

rash

A 60-year-old African American female with a history of hypertension presents to the emergency department for an itchy, diffuse rash. She first noticed the lesions a few years prior, and they have progressively become larger and more inflamed. The lesions have become severely pruritic over the last couple of months. Steroid creams did not appear to improve symptoms. Currently, the lesions on her arm have become painful with yellow drainage. The patient denies nausea, vomiting, and fever.

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SAEM Clinical Image Series: Red, White, & Blue

bite

A 29-year-old female presented to the emergency department for a rash on her right calf. 5 days prior, at her home in Alabama, the patient developed pain and swelling of her right calf following a spider bite while putting on her pants. The patient felt a “burning pain” and found a spider which she then killed. She went to a hospital and received cephalexin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and oxycodone. Despite taking these medications she continued having aching pain rated 10/10 in her right calf along with generalized pruritus. The patient stated that the bite evolved from an initial generalized redness into a blue/black lesion with blistering and extensive redness along her leg and torso. She denied fever, chills, lightheadedness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and hematuria.

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SAEM Clinical Image Series: Severe Cutaneous Lesions in an Immunocompromised Host

cutaneous lesions

A thirty-one-year-old female presented to the emergency department with the complaint of a painful rash for 2 days. She has a history of HIV with a known CD4 count < 200 cells/µL. She states that the rash began two days ago and progressed to the current size. She describes the rash as burning and has never experienced these symptoms before. She has tried topical corticosteroids which did not alleviate the pain.

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IDEA Series: Use of gamification through Clue: Pediatric Rash Edition

Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians care for anyone, with anything, at any time. This includes pediatric patients as well as adults. For those without advanced pediatric training, “sick kids” can be quite intimidating. Rashes in the pediatric population are often benign, but in rare cases they portend significant illness. Rashes are also frequent chief complaints; In 2015, there were 1,452,300 pediatric ED visits for “skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders” [1]. We sought to improve the teaching of pediatric rashes in our residency curriculum.

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By |2020-05-05T16:22:24-07:00May 13, 2020|Dermatology, IDEA series, Pediatrics|
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