SAEM Clinical Image Series: Severe Cutaneous Lesions in an Immunocompromised Host

cutaneous lesions

A thirty-one-year-old female presented to the emergency department with the complaint of a painful rash for 2 days. She has a history of HIV with a known CD4 count < 200 cells/µL. She states that the rash began two days ago and progressed to the current size. She describes the rash as burning and has never experienced these symptoms before. She has tried topical corticosteroids which did not alleviate the pain.

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IDEA Series: Use of gamification through Clue: Pediatric Rash Edition

Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians care for anyone, with anything, at any time. This includes pediatric patients as well as adults. For those without advanced pediatric training, “sick kids” can be quite intimidating. Rashes in the pediatric population are often benign, but in rare cases they portend significant illness. Rashes are also frequent chief complaints; In 2015, there were 1,452,300 pediatric ED visits for “skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders” [1]. We sought to improve the teaching of pediatric rashes in our residency curriculum.

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By |2020-05-05T16:22:24-07:00May 13, 2020|Dermatology, IDEA series, Pediatrics|

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Fever and Aches

rash dengue fever

A 62 year old female with no past medical history presented to the ED with fevers, generalized weakness, severe muscle aches, and a rash. She had returned home from the Philippines 3 days prior to evaluation. Twenty-four hours prior to arrival, the patient noticed a rash on her shins. She denied any nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, chest pain, shortness of breath, cough, sore throat, dysuria, urinary frequency, headache, and neck pain. The patient was in the Philippines for a family funeral and was indoors for most of the trip. She was unsure if she was stung by any bugs or mosquitos.

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SAEM Clinical Image Series: A Multifactorial Skin Eruption

Phytophotodermatitis - A Multifactorial Skin Eruption 1

A 9-year-old male with no past medical history, brought in by his mother to the ER with a new rash on his face and torso. The rash began 10 days ago. On the day he developed the rash, the patient noted swimming in a newly chlorinated outdoor pool. That same day he also played with freshly picked oranges and limes outdoors with his friends, having squeezed the juices onto his head and body. He developed a non-painful, non-pruritic, hyper-pigmented rash on his left cheek.

Over the course of 3 days, the patient and his family went on a trip to a local river, during which the rash evolved to scattered patches on his face and dorsum of his hands with an associated burning sensation exacerbated by contact with hot water or sunscreen. He received outpatient treated by a medical provider at day 3 for presumed infection with both oral and topical antibiotics. He completed the antibiotics, with worsening of his skin lesions. They have since formed blisters and affected his torso.

The patient never had any similar symptoms, or allergies. He had no sick contacts or travel outside the U.S. He denies any history of trauma, thermal burns, or arthropod exposure. The patient has not had fevers, respiratory symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, or urinary symptoms.

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By |2019-12-23T18:35:31-08:00Dec 24, 2019|Dermatology, SAEM Clinical Images|

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Rash and Headache in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Rash and Headache in AML 1, disseminated herpes zoster

A 25 year old male with a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after an allogeneic stem cell transplant, which has been in remission for 6 years. He presents with a headache and rash. 4 days ago the patient noticed a rash on the abdomen that was itchy, but not painful. Today, he noticed a similar rash on his face.

The headache started yesterday, waking him up from sleep. It is now slowly getting worse. He endorses chills, nausea, neck stiffness, neck pain, myalgias, and photophobia. He denies fevers, vomiting and phonophobia. He does have small headaches regularly but this headache is one of the most painful of his life. He does not take any immunosuppressants or medications.

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SAEM Clinical Image Series: Facial Burn

levamisole

A 50-year-old female with a history of bipolar disorder, ADHD, anxiety, depression, and alcoholism presented to the ED after her family found her at home agitated, restless, and with a “large black burn” on her face. Her husband reported that she had been “picking” at this area of her face earlier in the day; at that time it appeared only slightly red. Per her husband, the patient had also felt “bugs crawling on her legs” and had been picking at and grabbing her legs on the day of presentation.

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