Paucis verbis card: The Red Eye

Here is another installment of the Paucis Verbis (In a Few Words) e-card series on the topic of The Red Eye from EM Clinics of North America, Here are some sample  images:

Keratoconjunctivitis

Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (note subtle white precipitates over pupil)

 

BacterialConjunctivitis

Bacterial conjunctivitis (note injection along inferior fornix)

 

Episcleritis

Episcleritis

 

Scleritis

Scleritis (note bluish hue of deep scleral vessels)

 

Glaucoma

Acute angle closure glaucoma (note corneal edema)

PV Card: The Red Eye


Go to ALiEM (PV) Cards for more resources.

By |2021-10-19T19:14:54-07:00Jan 22, 2010|ALiEM Cards, Ophthalmology|

Tricks of the Trade: Diagnosing retinal detachment with ultrasound

In a sneak peek of my ACEP News’ Tricks of the Trade column, Dr. Patrick Lenaghan, Dr. Ralph Wang, and I will discuss how bedside ultrasonography can significantly improve your ocular exam.

Here is a classic example. A patient presents with acute onset right eye pain and blurry vision. She possibly has a field cut in her vision. Her pupils are a teeny 2 mm in size in the brightly-lit Emergency Department. You are having a hard time getting a good fundoscopic exam to comfortably rule-out a retinal detachment.

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By |2019-01-28T23:53:04-08:00Dec 9, 2009|Ophthalmology, Tricks of the Trade, Ultrasound|

Trick of the Trade: Easy ocular application of fluoroscein

Fluorescein-1Gently instilling a fluorescein drop into a patient’s eye requires that the patient keep his/her eye still. What do you do for a patient who can’t quite stay still enough, such as an infant? This is an innovative trick of the trade, written by Dr. Sam Ko (Loma Linda EM resident) and Kimberly Chan (Loma Linda medical student).

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:53-08:00Nov 4, 2009|Ophthalmology, Tricks of the Trade|

Trick of the Trade: Super-sensitive to eyedrops

CornealUlcer-largeWe commonly encounter ocular complaints in the Emergency Department. Eye pain can result from chemical exposure, a foreign body, or infection. The first step involves instilling a few drops of topical anesthetics, such as proparacaine, to provide some pain relief. Occasionally, however, you encounter a patient who just can’t keep his/her eye open because of the fear of eyedrops.

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:54-08:00Oct 28, 2009|Ophthalmology, Tricks of the Trade|
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