Article review: Carnegie’s vision for medical education

StethoscopeBookIn 2010, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching published recommendations for the future reform of medical education. This same Carnegie Foundation had also commissioned and published the landmark 1910 Flexner report 1  on medical education, exactly 100 hears prior.

Here is a summary of the four major recommendations:

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By |2019-01-28T22:43:03-08:00Jun 27, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: Professionalism in the ED through the eyes of medical students


Professionalism
Teaching professionalism in a formal curriculum is so much different than demonstrating professionalism in the Emergency Department. So much of what students and residents learn about professionalism are from observed behaviors of the attending physicians — that is, the hidden curriculum.

In a qualitative study assessing medical student reflection essays during an EM clerkship, the authors (my friends Dr. Sally Santen and Dr. Robin Hemphill) found some startling results. The instructions to the medical students were to “think about an aspect of professionalism that has troubled you this month. Write a minimum of one half-page reflection describing what was concerning and how you might handle it.”

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By |2016-11-11T18:52:55-08:00Jun 20, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Article review: Improving case presentations with theater training

“To be or not to be?”

What could be more strange on a medical school curriculum than a theater training course? The authors of this study in Medical Humanities innovatively designed a 1-week elective course to help medical students at Mayo Medical School to improve their case presentation skills in partnership with the Guthrie Theater.

In this pilot course, seven medical students (six 1st year students, one 4th year student) participated. The learning objectives were:

  • Hear stories: those told by patients, colleagues and in written narratives
  • Identify the elements of a narrative, and examine stories for narrative structure 
  • Share stories: through case presentations, body movement, storytelling and acting 
  • Present a patient’s story with elements of traditional medical presentation and narrative

Students were evaluated for the following competencies:

  • The cognitive capacity and flexibility needed to evaluate and acquire reliable clinical information. 
  • The ability to actively and generously observe and listen to another. 
  • An understanding of the components of narrative leading to effective story construction. 
  • A performance sensibility that ensures the delivery of a good story, otherwise known as stage presence. 
  • The finesse to communicate empathically with a patient to create an environment in which she or he feels safe, satisfied and heard.

Eleven sessions, over 25 hours, comprised of the following topics:

  • Improvisation activities
  • Introduction to case presentations
  • Body language – contact improvisation
  • Performance of story
  • Neutral dialogue and elements of a narrative
  • Narrative in context – what’s lost, what’s gained?
  • Listening with a neutral mask
  • Storytelling
  • Writing and presenting case histories
  • The art of personal monologue
  • Final presentations with professional critique

Survey responses uniformly found that students valued this creative, non-traditional approach to learning about interpersonal communications and oral presentations. The art of focused storytelling to an audience  is exactly what physicians do every day when presenting clinical cases.


Reference
Hammer RR, et al. Telling the Patient’s Story: using theatre training to improve case presentation skills. Medical humanities. 2011, 37(1), 18-22. PMID: 21593246
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By |2016-11-11T18:53:06-08:00May 30, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Videos: The EM Eye Exam

Thanks to Dr. David Duong and Dr. Najm Haqu (UCSF) for letting me cross-post their amazing instructional video on the “EM Eye Exam”. These videos were made for the purpose of teaching senior medical students on their UCSF-SFGH EM clerkship. I thought it’d be great to share these tutorials, since the eye exam is typically a daunting task for many medical students (and residents).

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By |2019-01-28T22:49:24-08:00May 12, 2011|Ophthalmology|

Article Review: Online curriculum for non-EM residents in the ED

 

OnlineCurrIn many academic Emergency Departments, there are “off-service” or non-EM residents rotating in the department. They are sometimes invited to the EM residency conference series for the month. Often times though, they have too many departmental didactic events and obligations of their own that they don’t have time to attend formal EM didactics.

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By |2016-11-11T19:00:11-08:00Jan 24, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Need your help! Favorite medical apps

 

AppsSo, I volunteered to give a talk for the UCSF Office of Graduate Medical Education WAAAAY back in early 2010 on “There’s an App for That:  Key Smart Phone Applications for Surviving Residency“. Somehow the lecture date has snuck up on me and it’s next Tuesday! I thought it was a small gathering, but it turns out it’s not. Plus, I keep getting school-wide emails reminding all the residents and fellows to attending!

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By |2016-11-11T19:00:13-08:00Jan 13, 2011|Social Media & Tech|

Residency interview season: Pitfalls

 

InterviewI often get asked by my advisees: “In my residency interview, what should I talk about or do to make myself more competitive?”

To help you demystify the interview process, I wanted to share with you some insights. Overall, the interview day itself helps the program put a person and personality with your online ERAS application. Similarly, you quickly get a sense of the program’s personality. In EM, the residency interview day is generally pretty laid back. Not too many crazy questions. Programs just want to get to know you. Both you and the program should be asking each other– Is this a good fit?

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By |2016-11-11T19:00:21-08:00Nov 4, 2010|Medical Education|