About Nikita Joshi, MD

ALiEM Chief People Officer and Associate Editor
Clinical Instructor
Department of Emergency Medicine
Stanford University

Most Followed #FOAMed Women on Twitter

twitter_2012In 2014 we published a list of the Most Followed #FOAMed Twitter Users (FOAM = Free Open Access Meducation). One observation, keenly pointed out by Dr. Nikita Joshi (@njoshi8), was the lack of female representation on the list. Separately, Dr. Esther Choo (@choo_ek) published a blog post entitled Women in Emergency Medicine Who Give Great Talks. As a follow up to our original post, here are the most ‘followed’ women on Twitter in the FOAM world.

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SimLIFE-EM Challenge: Add to the conversation

simLIFE-EM

Debriefings in medical simulation are meant to be the bow on top of the gift that is medical simulation. It is the ultimate delicious dessert, served after a grueling dinner course. All analogies aside, debriefings are meant to drive home the teaching points, to gain a deeper understanding of medical resuscitation as a group, and create mental frameworks of the approach to various patients. But this is often easier described than actually done. We here at ALiEM paired with Dr. Henry Curtis to come up with a creative way of developing debriefing skills and gain deeper understanding of mental frameworks.

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2016-11-07T12:40:10-07:00

Improving debriefing skills: Two-column case and learning pathways grid

250px-teammeeting1ExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200Being a learner in a medical simulation case can be tough. But equally challenging, is the role of the Debriefer. This person has to balance the important task of debriefing the small group, provide feedback, and still maintain a positive and open learning environment. A 2013 paper by Rudolph et al attempts to show methods how to balance these demands while improving as a Debriefer through the use of 2 Column Case Analysis and Learning Pathway Grid.

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ALiEM Bookclub: How We Die

518buQWOFZLDNR/DNI, Code Blue, Cardiac Arrest, Traumatic Brain Injury, Exsanguination, Septic Shock, Respiratory Arrest…  and the list goes on. As healthcare providers, we are well versed in the medical and emergency resuscitations that can spiral into these dangerous arenas. Even if we don’t always know the exact cause, we know the mantra of ABCs and we stick to it until the end. The very last end… But the end of what? Where is the dignity in resuscitating a body that has already died? Ultimately the question becomes, are we as practitioners as well versed in letting go, in letting the body die, and then ultimately explaining that process to the family?

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2016-11-07T09:37:40-07:00

Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI): Annals of EM Resident Perspective article

MMIWe are very excited this month to bring you our first ALiEM-Annals Resident’s Perspective discussion. Similar to the ALiEM-Annals Global EM Journal Club series, we will be discussing the most recent Resident’s Perspective piece on the role of Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI) in the EM residency selection process. We hope you will participate in an online discussion based on the paper summary and questions below from now through May 11, 2014. Respond by commenting below or tweeting (#ALiEMRP).

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Announcing the ALiEM-CORD Social Media and Digital Scholarship Fellowship

CORDWe very are excited to announce an innovative, joint initiative with CORD (Council of EM Residency Directors) in launching the 2014-2015 ALiEM-CORD Social Media and Digital Scholarship Fellowship! The application process for this virtual fellowship is open as of right now to U.S. Emergency Medicine residents.

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2018-10-28T21:42:40-07:00

What makes a good clinical educator?

apple ExpertPeerReviewStamp2x200In this constantly evolving world of learner competencies, assessments, and milestones often is forgotten the important role of clinical teachers. We can all remember clinical instructors that stand out despite the grueling years of medical school and residency training. We admired them for various reasons and remember the insights and teaching pearls they bestowed upon us. But what exactly were the qualities that they possessed that other instructors did not have? What exactly did they have that made them a good clinical teacher in medicine?

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