21 09, 2017

IDEA Series: Teaching ECGs through a Written Competition

2017-09-20T20:58:52+00:00

The Problem

Idea Series LogoECG interpretation is a cornerstone of Emergency Medicine (EM). It requires both rapid identification of life-threatening abnormalities and fastidious attention to detail. This pairing can intimidate some junior learners, and identifying an effective and engaging method for teaching ECGs is important to resident education. We report a teaching method that addresses this problem with an annual residency ECG competition.

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19 09, 2017

SplintER Series: Splint Principles 101

2017-09-18T14:27:49+00:00

splint plaster materialWhy do we splint? Splinting is one of the fundamental procedures of the Emergency Department (ED). How well-versed are we with it? Why do we even splint? By the end of this post, you will know the reason why we splint, when to splint, and just as importantly — when NOT to splint in the ED.
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18 09, 2017

SplintER: A New Series on Orthopedic Injuries and Splinting

2017-09-18T14:32:50+00:00

splintingThe purpose of the SplintER series is to teach the fundamentals and introduce advanced concepts of splinting to the Emergency Medicine (EM) professional. Humans have been splinting their injuries since 1300 B.C.1 Although the fundamentals have not changed, splint selection and application require some thoughtful consideration. A 2017 prospective, observational study in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics demonstrated that more than 90% of splints applied in the Emergency Department were inappropriate (30% applied by EM attendings), as evaluated by orthopaedic surgeons.2 While that number may not be representative in your institution, it certainly highlights the inadequacies that many of us feel when approaching a splint!

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17 09, 2017

I am Liz Crowe, Advanced Clinical Social Worker: How I Stay Healthy in EM

2017-09-15T11:50:04+00:00

Our work isn’t easy, but it would be impossible without the help of our colleagues. It’s time for our second post on How Our ED Colleagues Stay Healthy in EM!

Liz Crowe is an Advanced Clinical Social Worker from Brisbane, Australia. She is no stranger to the FOAMed world, and her electric personality is infectious. Always laughing, always trying to make others smile, that’s just how she rolls. Here’s how she stays healthy in EM!

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10 09, 2017

I am Dr. Linda Regan, EM Program Director: How I Stay Healthy in EM

2017-09-09T15:26:01+00:00

Dr. Linda Regan is an emergency physician from Baltimore, Maryland. When she’s not on shift, she can be found taking care of her residents and colleagues, always placing others before herself. Dr. Regan’s holistic approach to her career and everyday life is something for all of us to emulate! When she’s not occupied with one of her many jobs, she can be found enjoying time with family and friends. Here’s how she stays healthy in EM!

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8 09, 2017

26 Best Wellness Apps for Emergency Physicians | A Wellness Think Tank Initiative

2017-09-08T06:56:11+00:00

wellness appsIf you have spent any time working in an emergency department in the last 10 years, you have undoubtedly come across a conversation about wellness and burnout in medicine. Despite increasing awareness, the data is bleak: Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians experience burnout more than any other specialty.1 As we consider that EM was the second most popular Match in 2017, it’s important to focus on collaborative efforts and ensure that the increasing number of EM trainees does not lead to a generation of burned out EM providers.2

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1 09, 2017

IDEA Series: Video Review as an Experiential Model for Difficult Airway Education

2017-09-01T06:47:12+00:00

The Problem

Idea Series LogoDifficult airways, including those that are edematous, burned, soiled, or traumatic, pose one of the greatest procedural challenges for emergency physicians. Furthermore, unanticipated difficult airways represent 5-15% of intubations in the ED. Emergency medicine residents gain experience with difficult airways largely through hands-on practice while caring for critically ill patients. The relatively low frequency of complex intubations, however, necessitates an educational model that extends beyond the ED and can be shared with multiple learners.
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