Teorías de la Educación en la Práctica (Education Theory Made Practical): An International Collaboration

spanish language book Teorías de la Educación en la Práctica

The vast majority of medical education materials (free or with cost) are available in the English language, a consequence of its hegemony as the language of science at a global level. In the world there are about 560 million people who speak Spanish, 460 million are native speakers, so Spanish is the language that has the second largest population of native speakers in the world after Mandarin. Although written English is understood by the Spanish-speaking community of health professionals, the best way to fully understand a text is reading it in the mother tongue!

It is therefore important to thank Teresa Chan from ALiEM and the clinical educators’ team that collaborate in the development of several texts on how to make educational theories practical, for their willingness to translate their material into other languages. The series “Education Theory Made Practical” (ALiEM Library) presents, with a simple but powerful strategy, educational clinical cases and reviews of the main educational theories for the consumption of students, resident physicians, and medical teachers around the world. These heroes and heroines of medical education have made this material available in free digital format, and with the Spanish translation of the first volume of this series (available at the Apple Bookstore and in ResearchGate) will help the community of Spanish-speaking medical educators with high-quality material for use in our countries. There is a great need for similar materials in Spanish, it is our fervent desire that the process of translation of these books continue, to help improve the quality of medical education globally.

 


La gran mayoría de los materiales de educación médica (gratuitos o con costo) están disponibles en el idioma inglés, consecuencia de su hegemonía como el idioma de la ciencia a nivel global. En el mundo hay cerca de 560 millones de personas que hablan español, 460 millones son hablantes nativos, por lo que el español es el idioma que tiene la segunda población de hablantes nativos en el mundo después del mandarín. A pesar de que la comunidad de profesionales de la salud hispanoparlantes entienden el inglés escrito, ¡no hay como leer un texto en la lengua materna para entenderlo cabalmente!

Es por ello importante agradecer a Teresa Chan de McMaster, Canadá y el equipo de clínicos educadores que colaboran en el desarrollo de varios textos sobre cómo hacer prácticas las teorías educativas, por su disposición para realizar la traducción de su material a otros idiomas. La serie “Teorías de la educación en la práctica” presenta, con un esquema sencillo pero poderoso, casos clínicos educativos y revisiones de las principales teorías educativas para consumo de estudiantes, médicos residentes y profesores de medicina de todo el mundo. Estos héroes y heroínas de la educación médica han puesto este material en formato digital y gratuito, y con la traducción al español del primer volumen de esta serie (disponible en la librería de Apple y en ResearchGate) ayudan a la comunidad de educadores médicos hispanoparlantes a tener un material de excelente calidad para su uso en los países hispanoamericanos. Hay una gran necesidad de materiales similares en español, es nuestro ferviente deseo que continúe la traducción de estos libros para mejorar la calidad de la educación médica en el mundo.

 

Reading from the Silver Linings Playbook: The ALiEM Connect Project

ALiEM Connect graduation

It feels like yesterday that we were sheltered-in-place, staring at our computers, wondering, “So now what?” 

As COVID-19 paused all in-person educational sessions, the early morning residency conference we used to begrudgingly join quickly became something that we profoundly missed. While we can now be “present” while wearing sweatpants and a button-down shirt, we miss the human connection. Many of us would gladly even suffer through traffic just to be a part of this morning conference tradition.

As educators and innovators, we know what a disruptive force the COVID-19 pandemic has been to the medical community. It has strained our medical and healthcare systems and has irrevocably altered our day-to-day lives. Without a doubt, the pandemic also changed how we delivered educational content to our learners over the past year.

Scholars have written about how likely this pandemic will likely precipitate the much-needed digital transformation of healthcare and health professions education that many of us have expected and hoped for. But while some of these innovations are born out of necessity, they may also inadvertently isolate us from the experiential aspects of education and human interaction that provide meaning to our work. For the ALiEM team, we cherish the opportunity to be part of some of these significant innovative and positive “disruptions,” further aligning our goal of creating an impactful and fulfilling academic life in emergency medicine. 

The Backstory

As a remote team working across continents, the ALiEM team has thrived on digital connection for over a decade. With excellent collaborators and volunteers representing different parts of the world, our daily operations require us to stay connected and work asynchronously to achieve our goals and deliverables. When the lockdowns hit, we leveraged its impact on physical distancing and leaned into connecting with each other even more! They say “chance favors the prepared mind,” and there we were, already on Slack and yearning for the opportunity to harness the power of teamwork using our shared passions, individual creative strengths, and enthusiastic and supportive emojis. There were moments of creating, moments of celebration, and moments of simply being with each other – often through an evening #WifiAndWine.

By the Ides of March 2020, an auspicious time indeed, we knew we were at a turning point. Our friends and work families had been working on the front lines combating the pandemic locally, gathering PPE, and studying the effects of a virus we knew next to nothing about. New information was coming in daily, and the signal-to-noise ratio was low. In some ways, to escape the disruptions going on all around us, we banded together to focus our unique energies toward creating something as novel as the virus itself in the realm of free open-access medical education.

At a time where everyone was feeling alone, we asked ourselves how we could support the joy of learning from and with each other? In truly whirlwind fashion, the first ALiEM Connect conference went from idea to execution in less than 2 weeks, a record-breaking time even for ALiEM. Thank especially to the American Board of Emergency Medicine for sponsoring these events.

We recently made it to the semi-finals at the CORD/ACEP Innovator of the Year competition, where we shared the below video capturing the fun, collaboration, and innovative outcome of our efforts. Oh, and the familiar ratatat of Slack.

Making this a Multiple Win

The secret sauce of the ALiEM team is that we have a diverse group of people, each of whom brings their own perspective and that we are able to share with one another liberally. Dr. Michelle Lin encouraged an environment that is psychologically safe and supportive since the inception of the ALiEM enterprise. It is out of this space that our diverse team was able to successfully bring a massively successful project to fruition amid a global pandemic. What started as a small brainstorming session blossomed into ALiEM Connect – 3 distinct remote conferences featuring nationally-recognized educators and thought leaders enjoyed by residents across the country.

It’s difficult to express as a linear narrative, but looking back, it seems as though our team divided into unique roles without a second thought. Just like a production company, we had the front and back of the house. Those in the front made sure to help get people in the seats to watch; stage managers and coordinators ensured that every part of each of the ALiEM Connect experiences was phenomenally smooth. We had talented individuals who acted as hosts and speakers to ensure that each of these experiences was top-notch and engaging. In the back, Drs. Mary Haas, Yusuf Yilmaz, and Teresa Chan sprung quickly into action to create a program evaluation strategy for our ALiEM Connect program, including a formal institutional review board exemption! All the while, testing and vetting platforms and methods to distribute the material were ongoing. We built upon each technological skill, learned new platforms, and trialed different features. We had barely decided on an open, free, and accessible platform (which was, in fact, no individual platform but an amalgamation of many!) before sending out the invites.

But the fun didn’t stop there! We’re the “academic” life in emergency medicine! How could we not also share our results with the traditional academic community? Within days of finishing our first ALiEM Connect experience, our program evaluation team generated the scaffolding of a manuscript to put together our thoughts and analyze the evaluation data collected. We harnessed the power of metrics from social media platforms (YouTube, Slack, Twitter), website analytics, and end-user experiences. Harnessing all of these analytics and communicating the right message with our academic medicine community was important to inform and help others to replicate similar approaches to their residents. Our team used ready to use metrics which came from YouTube analytics. But we did not stop there as we needed more reports of how the residents and programs interacted during the Connect events in the backchannel, Slack. We developed Python supported software to export and analyze all the messages happening in separate channels. We developed a “Emoji Cloud” to see how the reactions happened, and closely analyzed the messages during the event.

Given the true novelty of the experience, we figured we might as well shoot for the moon, as they say, by submitting our innovation description paper to Academic Medicine. After all, even if they didn’t accept it, we might get some constructive reviews, to say the least. As innovators, we are comfortable with the possibility of failure. We understand the value of the saying, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take,” and were prepared to accept “no” as an answer. With that, we took a calculated risk, making use of the same collaborative strategy to craft a manuscript, and clicked submit.

…And we’re glad we took that shot! We are excited to share that what we sent was indeed accepted and express our gratitude for the chance to share our low-cost approach to a large-scale, nationwide residency conference! You may read the Published Ahead-of-Print version of our paper.

Moral of the story…

You might be asking yourself, “What’s the moral of the story here? Of course, with enough academics and experts, yeah, you got a paper published. Cool…” But the papers aren’t the point. In fact, during the COVID-19 pandemic, more papers have been published than ever before – more research is being done, and our whole field is changing. The point is… this is how we got to ENJOY the academic life during a pandemic! We made lemonade (and several other desserts!) out of the lemons we were handed. New knowledge comes from thinking big and trying new things. Turns out, sometimes you also have to write about those experiences and share them with others.

As emergency physicians, we know we’re good in a crisis. But this experience reminded us that by surrounding ourselves with amazing people, we could get a surprising amount of work done (at record speed) and have a fantastically memorable time along the way. The moral of this story is that when you bring great people together and give them a chance to get to know each other, magic happens. ALiEM Connect happens. And we impact more people than we can possibly meet at the touch of our keyboards. We are so grateful for the chance to work alongside all the wonderful people at each of our institutions every day. Still, also, we are indebted to those who are our digital family. Thank you to all of you who make initiatives like ALiEM Connect possible. Academic life in emergency medicine is all about bringing a great team together.

So is the ALiEM team.

Banishing Busy: Part 3

banishing busy

Medical professionals are busy people and exist in a constant state of “being busy.” How do we resolve chronic “busy-ness”? How do we manage our time effectively? In her recent talk at the CORD Academic Assembly 2020, Dr. Christina Shenvi, EM Physician and Associate Residency Director at UNC, provided 5 key actions to help us be productive, complete our work effectively, and strive for work-life balance. Dr. Shenvi recorded her lecture again to be shared with the ALiEM Faculty Incubator. This series of posts breaks down her talk into 3 sections in order to summarize her key points and to help us “Banish Busy” from our lives. This third post will address how to take control of our time.

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By |2020-07-10T10:48:16-07:00Jul 17, 2020|Life, Professional Development|

Little Big Med Podcast: Gender Equity in Medicine

It’s time to talk about gender equity in medicine. Significant gender disparities exist in both healthcare institutions and professional societies. These disparities persist even in fields that are predominantly female, such as pediatrics. In fact, although women comprise 72.3% of active pediatricians, only 27.5% of pediatric department chairs across US medical schools are women. Why does this disparity exist? What can we do to address it? In this episode of the Little Big Med podcast, host Dr. Jason Woods discusses these questions with Dr. Nancy Spector, Professor of Pediatrics at Drexel University College of Medicine and Executive Director of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program.

(more…)

Banishing Busy: Part 2

banishing busy

Medical professionals are busy people and exist in a constant state of “being busy.” How do we resolve chronic “busy-ness”? How do we manage our time effectively? In her recent talk at the CORD Academic Assembly 2020, Dr. Christina Shenvi, EM Physician and Associate Residency Director at UNC, provided 5 key actions to help us be productive, complete our work effectively, and strive for work-life balance. Dr. Shenvi recorded her lecture again to be shared with the ALiEM Faculty Incubator. This series of posts breaks down her talk into 3 sections in order to summarize her key points and to help us “Banish Busy” from our lives. This second post will discuss seven ways to avoid self-sabotage.

(more…)

By |2020-08-25T18:03:30-07:00Jul 3, 2020|Life, Professional Development|

Banishing Busy: Part 1

banishing busy

Medical professionals are busy people and exist in a constant state of “being busy.” How do we resolve chronic “busy-ness”? How do we manage our time effectively? In her recent talk at the CORD Academic Assembly 2020, Dr. Christina Shenvi, EM Physician and Associate Residency Director at UNC, provided 5 key actions to help us be productive, complete our work effectively, and strive for work-life balance. Dr. Shenvi recorded her lecture again to be shared with the ALiEM Faculty Incubator. This series of posts breaks down her talk into 3 sections in order to summarize her key points and to help us “Banish Busy” from our lives. This first post will address the importance of value-based scheduling and how to avoid self-sabotage.

(more…)

By |2020-08-25T18:02:15-07:00Jun 26, 2020|Life, Professional Development|

CRincubator Live: A Chief Resident Professional Development Learning Lab

CRincubator Live“In every crisis, there is an opportunity.” This famous quote by Albert Einstein illustrates the opportunity to reinvent our Chief Resident Incubator (“CRincubator”) year-long experience. We had planned to retire the CRincubator as of a month ago. However, given the relative void in Chief Resident professional development opportunities this year because of physical distancing rules, we wanted to share our lessons learned and resources developed over the past 5 years. We thus announce a half-day, online, professional development learning lab opportunity to all EM Chief Residents. Come join us on May 6, 2020. Read more about the unique curriculum and our all-star speaker line-up on our CRincubator Live homepage.

By |2020-04-17T23:42:17-07:00Apr 18, 2020|Incubators, Professional Development|
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