Hot off the Press: Talking about Web 2.0 in Emergency Medicine

I am humbled to be included and quoted in a recent Annals of EM commentary about Web 2.0 in Emergency Medicine. Hey, my “street credibility” just went up just by having my name in the same article with the likes of:
You can read the whole article, which is free to download by the journal.
By |2019-01-28T22:34:16-08:00Apr 8, 2012|Medical Education, Social Media & Tech|

G-Advising: Using Google Hangout to advise medical students

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Get an advisor.

Don’t try to navigate medical school and residency on your own.

This is key especially during medical school as you try to get through and around the mounds of reading, paperwork, options, and pitfalls. If you are interested in Emergency Medicine (EM) as a career, that means getting one or several great EM advisors. Don’t rely on non-EM faculty to give you any insight into EM. Inevitably, I have found that they give incomplete or slightly skewed perspectives about the pros and cons of EM.

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By |2016-11-11T18:51:55-08:00Oct 26, 2011|Medical Education, Social Media & Tech|

Advice for the new EM interns, part II

Pediatrics-ED
As a followup to a previous post on “The 10 Commandments in Emergency Medicine”, we would like to pay tribute to our pediatric friends. More than a decade after it was initially published, Timothy Givens (also from Vanderbilt but the pediatric side) published “The 10 commandments of pediatric Emergency Medicine”. Although the original commandments still hold true, the pediatric commandments augment them nicely and are geared towards our littler patients.

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By |2016-11-11T19:59:20-08:00Aug 8, 2011|Medical Education|

Inspirational graduation speech by Conan

“Your perceived failure can become a catalyst for profound reinvention.”

“No specific job or career goal defines me, and it should not define you.”

— Conan O’Brien

I found this inspirational 2011 graduation speech by Conan O’Brien at Dartmouth College. It is a great mix of silly, witty, inspirational, and profound. Check it out. For those in Medicine and medical training, your dreams may change over time… and that’s ok.

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By |2019-01-28T22:36:32-08:00Jul 28, 2011|Medical Education|

A faculty’s perspective: Doing well on your EM clerkship

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To follow-up with Dr. Connolly’s perspective about the Top 10 tips for medical students to rock the EM clerkship rotation, I thought I would post some additional tips. Here are some more pearls:

11. Take ownership of your patients. 

This means that you should take it upon yourself to make sure that your patient’s care is stellar, addresses key clinical and social issues, and is timely. Constantly check for your patient’s results. Don’t be the last to hear of your patient’s lab or imaging results. Figure out why there are unexpected delays. Address any psychosocial issues which may hamper your patient’s clinical improvement in the ED. (more…)

By |2016-11-11T18:52:47-08:00Jul 5, 2011|Medical Education|

An intern’s perspective: Doing well on your EM clerkship

AdrianFlores1smIt’s that time of year again. When medical students interested in EM are stressing over doing well on their EM rotation.

Here’s a very insightful guest post from Dr. James Connolly, who is a new PGY-1 resident at Hahnemann Hospital in Philadelphia. I’ll write my personal top-10 list next week, from the perspective of a faculty member.

Many MS4 interested in emergency medicine will be starting their EM Sub-I’s in the next few weeks and are naturally wondering what to expect, and how they can be successful, both in terms of getting a strong letter of recommendation, and all while still having a fun and enjoyable rotation. With that in mind, I’d like to present a unique “Top Ten” list, written with the aim of helping the student succeed on his or her upcoming rotation. The list is my own, based on my experiences during three EM rotations last year as a medical student.  I’ve also asked a few of my fellow interns for their input on the list, so the list really reflects thoughts of a handful of people who recently successfully matched into emergency medicine.

By |2019-01-28T22:42:19-08:00Jun 30, 2011|Medical Education|