EM Fellowship Match Advice: Medical Education Fellowship

By |Feb 28, 2020|Categories: EM Match Advice, Podcasts|0 Comments

One of the more popular fellowships in Emergency Medicine (EM) is the Medical Education Fellowship. These fellowships come in 1- and 2-year formats and some also come with an advanced degree. What do typical medical education and medical education scholarship fellowships typically entail? What are the logistics and timing when you decide to apply? Hosted by Dr. Michael Gisondi (Stanford) and Dr. Michelle Lin (UCSF), this podcast with 3 esteemed fellowship directors help provide some much-needed guidance. […]

IDEA series: REDman simulation for teaching resuscitation skills in low-resource settings

By |Feb 21, 2020|Categories: IDEA series, Simulation|1 Comment

In many parts of the world, emergency medicine is just beginning to emerge as a specialty. In Pakistan, for example, it was introduced as recently as 2012. Hands-on training in the management of critically-ill medical and trauma patients is imperative for adequate preparation of board-certified emergency physicians, but accurate simulation can be hard to come by in developing nations. There are very few training programs and dedicated centers for healthcare professionals, and even fewer that have simulation [1]. High-tech simulation equipment is often cost-prohibitive; a mobile, low-tech simulation lab could potentially address the need for advanced training in resuscitation for [...]

  • EMS fellowship

Navigating Life After Residency: 10 Lessons I Learned in EMS Fellowship

By |Feb 14, 2020|Categories: EMS, Professional Development|1 Comment

The transition from residency to your first job or fellowship is an exciting time in any career. New opportunities for professional growth appear, but with them come a new and unique set of challenges. Transitioning from a structured clinical environment to more independent work and self-driven projects can be a difficult transition. For this reason, we wanted to share a few lessons we’ve learned. Although this advice is derived from our experience in EMS fellowship, we expect that it will apply and be helpful to other upcoming fellows and all people stepping away from residency to enter the workforce. [...]

Book Club: Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor

By |Feb 7, 2020|Categories: Book Club, Incubators|0 Comments

One of the most common themes in advice for career advancement is “find a mentor.” But we are rarely told HOW to find a mentor, WHY we need mentors, or WHAT ROLE mentors are supposed to play in our careers. In addition to the lack of direction regarding mentorship, when you start to research “what is mentorship,” it becomes clear that there are several limitations to the benefits of this popularized mentor-mentee relationship. To see results, the key may be more than mentorship and the answer is likely sponsorship. […]

  • Entrustable professional activities

Should the Trainee be Trusted? A User’s Guide to Assessment with EPAs

By |Jan 24, 2020|Categories: Academic, Medical Education|1 Comment

You are an attending working with a fourth-year medical student on their emergency medicine clerkship. The student sees a patient with the chief complaint of dizziness. After an initial assessment, the student says that there are no red flags in the history and the patient has a normal neurological exam. In the back of your mind you are thinking, “Does this student know the risk factors, comorbidities, and red flags? Was a thorough neurological exam performed?” How do you know the trainee should be trusted? […]

Introducing the 2020-2021 ALiEM Faculty Incubator Cohort!

By |Jan 17, 2020|Categories: Incubators, Medical Education|0 Comments

We put the call out, and *wow* did the MedEd community respond! We were beyond excited this year about the quality of our applicants for the 2020-2021 ALiEM Faculty Incubator.  This next cohort will include educators from across the globe and from all arenas of medicine including pre-clinical educators and our first nurse practitioner! […]

Peer Accountability: A Strategy for Maintaining Commitment to Personal and Professional Obligations

By |Jan 10, 2020|Categories: Professional Development, Wellness|0 Comments

There are a number of personal attributes characterizing the professional identity of “physician.” We are dedicated to patients, committed to lifelong learning, and responsible for a variety of other professional obligations. Each requires physicians to be highly accountable – obligated or willing to accept responsibility for one’s actions. In this post we present examples of how we’ve adopted peer accountability as a strategy to help us with the myriad responsibilities and obligations at the heart of our profession. Just in time for the New Year – we challenge each of our readers to consider finding an “accountability partner” in 2020! [...]

Teaming Tips 10: Resuscitate Your Meetings | ALiEM Faculty Incubator

By |Dec 27, 2019|Categories: Incubators, Medical Education, Professional Development|0 Comments

Many of you are asked to take a leadership role in leading a team, whether it’s for research, administration, or even clinical. It is easy to feel unprepared for these roles, and there are many pitfalls waiting to sabotage your team’s productivity. The ALiEM Faculty Incubator has created a series of 10 case-based teaming problems to provide you with evidence-based advice and solutions for tackling some of the more common problems encountered in our professional team experiences. […]

TLDR Book Review: The Culture Code – The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups

By |Dec 20, 2019|Categories: Book Club, TLDR|Tags: |0 Comments

Have you had shifts or worked on committees where everything went smoothly? Closed loop communication happened, there was mutual respect among all the team members, and each individual felt empowered to give input even if it differed from what had already been said or done? You’ve probably also worked on shifts, in meetings, or participated in projects where it seemed like the team was falling apart, communicating on different wavelengths, and failing to have a shared understanding. You may feel like a great leader one day and a failure the next. The difference, according to The Culture Code, has everything [...]

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IDEA Series: Just-in-Time Training for Diagnostic Paracentesis

By |Dec 18, 2019|Categories: Academic, Gastrointestinal, IDEA series|0 Comments

According to the National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey, approximately 630,000 adults in the United States have cirrhosis of the liver, 69% of which are reportedly unaware of having liver disease. A diagnostic paracentesis is a simple procedure for identifying spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients with ascites. A just-in-time training (JITT) model incorporating low-fidelity equipment readily available in the ED can facilitate procedural teaching of the diagnostic paracentesis. […]