SAEM Clinical Image Series: Eye Injury

By |Nov 2, 2020|Categories: Academic, Emergency Medicine, Ophthalmology, SAEM Clinical Images|0 Comments

An 11-year-old male presented to a pediatric trauma center following a motor vehicle collision (MVC). He was the restrained front-seat passenger when his vehicle was struck head-on, causing frontal airbag deployment. His primary complaint was pain around his right eye with associated blurry vision. He denied diplopia, pain with extraocular movements, flashers, floaters, or curtains in his vision. [+]

IDEA Series: Virtual “Faux-tation” Rotation for 4th Year Medical Students Interested in Emergency Medicine

By |Oct 26, 2020|Categories: clerkships, IDEA series, Medical Education, Medical Student|0 Comments

Visiting clerkships have traditionally offered the opportunity for extended contact among medical student applicants and residency program representatives, allowing for enhanced assessment of mutual compatibility. Accordingly, visiting clerkships are consistently rated as an essential consideration among residency program leadership when reviewing applications, and among medical students, as they determine “fit” [1,2]. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in institutional restrictions on visiting clerkships. Despite the now limited opportunities for medical students to see residency programs of interest in-person, demand for these experiences remains high. Opportunities that allow for increased interaction among medical student applicants and residency programs that maintain compliance with [+]

Treating Blood Pressure in Intracranial Hemorrhage

By |Oct 23, 2020|Categories: Academic, Emergency Medicine, Neurology|0 Comments

Blood pressure control in the setting of ischemic stroke has a clearly recognized benefit in patient outcomes. The impact of blood pressure control in hemorrhagic stroke is not as well understood. The ACEP E-QUAL Network podcast, a partnership with ALiEM to promote clinical practice improvements, reviewed this topic with Dr. Latha Ganti (University of Central Florida College of Medicine). Dr. Ganti addressed the evidence behind recommended blood pressure targets and the available medications to achieve control. We present highlights from this discussion with Dr. Jason Woods.    What is the goal of blood pressure control in hemorrhagic stroke? Management of [+]

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Pitching Pain

By |Oct 19, 2020|Categories: Academic, Emergency Medicine, SAEM Clinical Images|0 Comments

A twenty-year-old right-handed male presented to the emergency department with a past medical history of right coracoid impingement, and three months of increasing right shoulder pain that became suddenly worse. He had a right shoulder arthroscopy nine months ago and played a full season as his baseball team’s pitcher over the past four months. He endorsed no exacerbating symptoms other than movement and has only taken naproxen over the counter for this pain. He denied any family history of clotting disorders. [+]

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Knee Pain

By |Oct 19, 2020|Categories: Academic, Emergency Medicine, Orthopedic, SAEM Clinical Images, Ultrasound|0 Comments

A fifty-six-year-old male with a past medical history of legal blindness and remote right quadricep tendon rupture presents to the emergency department via emergency medical services (EMS) after a mechanical fall, complaining of left knee pain. According to the patient, he is in his regular state of health and was walking with his cane when he had a mechanical fall on the sidewalk after tripping on an unknown object and falling onto his left knee. The patient did not hit his head, did not lose consciousness, and has no head, neck, or back pain. The [+]

Anticoagulant Reversal in Hemorrhagic Stroke

By |Oct 16, 2020|Categories: Academic, Emergency Medicine, Neurology|0 Comments

Acute management of cerebrovascular accidents can be challenging enough, but questions about anticoagulant reversal in the setting of hemorrhagic stroke add another layer of complexity. The ACEP E-QUAL Network podcast, a partnership with ALiEM to promote clinical practice improvements, reviewed this topic with Dr. Joshua Goldstein (Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School). Dr. Goldstein addressed common anticoagulants and their reversal agents, summarizing available literature to inform clinical practice. We present highlights from this discussion with Dr. Jason Woods.   What is the goal of anticoagulant reversal? Since it is impossible to go back in time to prevent intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), the [+]

  • Geoff Comp

How I Work Smarter: Geoff Comp, DO

By |Oct 9, 2020|Categories: How I Work Smarter, Medical Education|0 Comments

One word that best describes how you work? Deliberate Current mobile device iPhone 7 Computer MacBook Pro What is something you are working on now? I am working on a series of EM department recommendations for the treatment of various environmental conditions, including heat associated injury and hypothermia, with multiple residents interested in wilderness medicine. How did you come up with this Idea/Project? Like all great projects, these were developed while chatting about interests over beers! We reviewed current recommendations from various sources during a wilderness medicine interest group meeting and discovered the department does not have official guidelines [+]

How I Work Smarter: Meenal Sharkey, MD

By |Sep 18, 2020|Categories: How I Work Smarter, Medical Education|0 Comments

One word that best describes how you work? Thoroughly Current mobile device iPhone 11 -- my whole life runs because of this phone! Computer MacBook Pro -- thank goodness for the iCloud that syncs my calendars, notes, and texts What is something you are working on now? Just finished the Grounded in EM curriculum and am now creating a Grand Rounds for Evidence-Based Medicine for Sepsis. One of my weaknesses is public speaking and also evidence-based medicine presentations. I like the concept of sepsis in general, so I picked this topic on purpose. It combined a topic I enjoy and [+]

IDEA Series: 3D-printed pediatric lumbar puncture trainer

By |Sep 16, 2020|Categories: IDEA series, Medical Education, Neurology, Pediatrics, Simulation|0 Comments

Pediatric lumbar puncture trainers are less available than adult trainers; most are the newborn size and quite expensive. Due to age-based practice patterns for fever diagnostic testing, most pediatric lumbar punctures are performed on young infants, and residents have fewer opportunities to perform lumbar punctures on older children.1 Adult lumbar puncture trainers have been created using a 3D-printed spine and ballistics gel, which allows for ultrasound guidance.2 No previous model has been described for pediatric lumbar puncture. [+]