Subsegmental Pulmonary Embolisms (SSPE) are Important

0125Multi-detector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) allows for better visualization of peripheral pulmonary arteries allowing for diagnosis of small peripheral emboli limited to the subsegmental pulmonary arteries. Interestingly as these SSPE’s get diagnosed more and more, two questions come to mind:

  1. What is the prognostic utility of diagnosing SSPEs?
  2. What is the morbidity and mortality of SSPEs compared to more proximal PEs?

A recent study in 2013 Blood looked at these questions. 1

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2016-11-11T19:17:47-07:00

The Not-So-Sick Health-Care Associated Pneumonia Patient: New Treatment Strategy

Case 1 RUL Apical Segment PA

Health-care associated pneumonia (HCAP) is the term used to describe patients presenting with pneumonia who may be at higher risk of multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens than other patients presenting from the community due to recent contact with the health care system. What are the criteria for HCAP?

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2016-11-11T19:17:36-07:00

52 Articles in 52 Weeks: Landmark EM Articles 2013

52To provide a resource for evidence-based Emergency Medical education, this list of must-read landmark articles was created to supplement the Emergency Medicine (EM) internship year of training. There are 52 articles so that one article can be read at leisure each week of the year. I searched national databases and polled faculty at the University of Washington to identify articles that faculty would expect any EM resident to be familiar with or that they felt were practice-changing in EM. Articles were selected for the final list based on the quality of study design, sample size, and relevance for EM residents.

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Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Size does matter and ECG can give us clues

PE

Acute pulmonary embolism (PE)  is a common condition that can be both severe and difficult to diagnose. Half of all acute PE cases are diagnosed in the emergency department, and acute PE follows acute coronary syndrome as the second most common cause of sudden unexpected death in outpatients. Also, right ventricular dysfunction is a consequence of massive/submassive acute pulmonary embolism and correlates with a poor prognosis and high mortality rate. Although an ECG lacks both sensitivity and specificity for acute PE, there are some clues that can help in determining the size of an acute PE.

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2016-11-11T19:03:54-07:00

Rivaroxaban for Pulmonary Embolism: One pill and done?

With Dr. Jeff Tabas giving a lecture on the perennially hot topic of pulmonary embolism (PE) at the upcoming UCSF High Risk EM Conference (main link, PDF Brochure) in San Francisco May 22-24, 2013, I thought I would get a sneak peek into his discussion points.

Rivaroxaban for Pulmonary Embolism: One pill and done?
By Prathap Sooriyakumaran, MD and Jeffrey Tabas, MD
UCSF-SFGH Emergency Medicine (more…)

2018-08-23T19:16:55-07:00