Paucis Verbis: Kawasaki Disease

Kawasaki diseaseKawasaki Disease can be easy to diagnose when you have the pediatric patient, who presents with all 5 of the classic clinical findings. What happens when you have the prerequisite fever for ≥5 days, but only 2-3 clinical criteria?

  • What ARE the 5 classic findings?
  • When do you do waitful watching?
  • When do you perform an echo?
  • When do you treat empirically?

Check out the nice flowchart below which addresses these questions. They summarize the most recent (2004) American Heart Association’s consensus group’s recommendations.

PV Card: Kawasaki Disease (AHA 2004)


Adapted from [1]
Go to ALiEM (PV) Cards for more resources.

Reference

  1. Newburger J, Takahashi M, Gerber M, et al. Diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of Kawasaki disease: a statement for health professionals from the Committee on Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis and Kawasaki Disease, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, American Heart Association. Circulation. 2004;110(17):2747-2771. [PubMed]
By |2021-10-10T19:08:53-07:00Mar 23, 2012|ALiEM Cards, Cardiovascular, Pediatrics|

Paucis Verbis: Pediatric fever without a source (3 mo-3 yr)

Thermometer Pediatric FeverIn part 3 of this “Pediatric Fever Without a Source” Paucis Verbis cards, we now cover febrile infants 3 months to 3 years old (PV cards for birth-28 days and 29 days-3 months old).

Notes:

  • The algorithm below is a guideline for NON-toxic patients. More ill-appearing children require a more broad workup.
  • For the under-immunized (<2 PCV immunizations) and temperature ≥39.5C, blood cultures may be falling out of favor in the near future, because the incidence of blood culture contaminants is close to exceeding the true incidence of occult bacteremia.

PV Card: Pediatric Fever Without a Source (3 Months-3 Years)


Go to ALiEM (PV) Cards for more resources.

Thanks to Dr. Hemal Kanzaria (UCSF-SFGH resident) for helping design this PV card and Dr. Christine Cho, Dr. Andi Marmor, and Dr. Ellen Laves (UCSF Pediatrics) for the content.

By |2021-10-11T15:10:11-07:00Feb 10, 2012|ALiEM Cards, Pediatrics|

Paucis Verbis: Fever without a source (29 days-3 months old)

Thermometer pediatric feverIn part 2 of this “Pediatric Fever Without a Source” Paucis Verbis cards, we now cover febrile infants aged 29 days to 3 months (PV card for birth-28 days). Note that there is no single correct answer in how to manage these patients. There can be a wide variation in practices, partly because of the slightly different criteria used by the 3 studies. The overarching principle is that “high risk” infants get admitted with IV ceftriaxone and “low risk” infants get discharged with close follow-up +/- a ceftriaxone IV or IM dose. The line between these two risk categories is the grey area.

Where I practice, we tend to follow a modified version of the Rochester criteria, where a lumbar puncture and antibiotics aren’t always required for this age group (unlike the Boston criteria).

PV Card: Pediatric Fever Without a Source (29 Days-3 Months)


Go to ALiEM (PV) Cards for more resources.

Keep a lookout for future PV cards which will address fevers without a source in pediatric patients aged 3 months-3 years old.

Thanks to Dr. Hemal Kanzaria (UCSF-SFGH resident) for helping design this PV card and Dr. Christine Cho, Dr. Andi Marmor, and Dr. Ellen Laves (UCSF Pediatrics) for the content.

By |2021-10-11T15:12:51-07:00Feb 3, 2012|ALiEM Cards, Pediatrics|

Paucis Verbis: Pediatric fever without a source (Birth-28 days)

Thermometer pediatric feverPediatric patients commonly are brought to the Emergency Department for a fever without a source. Management of these patients depends on the patient’s age. Today’s PV card focuses on the youngest age group: Birth-to-28 days.

QUESTION to everyone:

  • Do you correct your age calculation for prematurity? Premature neonates are more at risk for SBI, but I’ve seen varying practices.

PV Card: Pediatric Fever Without a Source (Birth-28 Days Old)


Go to ALiEM (PV) Cards for more resources.

Keep a lookout for future PV cards which will address fevers without a source in pediatric patients aged 29 days-3 months and 3 months-3 years old.

Thanks to Dr. Hemal Kanzaria (UCSF-SFGH resident) for helping design this PV card and Dr. Christine Cho, Dr. Andi Marmor, and Dr. Ellen Laves (UCSF Pediatrics) for the content.

By |2021-10-11T15:15:20-07:00Jan 27, 2012|ALiEM Cards, Pediatrics|

Trick of the Trade: Pediatric ear exam

ChildEaraches2

Performing a physical exam on frightened pediatric patients can often be challenging. I am always thrilled to add more child-whisperer techniques to my arsenal of tricks. I have written in the past about:

What’s your trick on performing an otoscope exam of the ears?

(more…)

By |2019-02-19T18:08:03-08:00Sep 20, 2011|ENT, Pediatrics, Tricks of the Trade|
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