education theory made practical, volumes 4 and 5 cover book

Back by popular demand and thanks to a generous grant from the Government of Ontario’s eCampus initiative, the ALiEM team is delighted to announce the publication of 2 new eBook publications: Volumes 4 and 5 of the Education Theory Made Practical eBook series [ALiEM Library]. Like all of the others that have come before, these books were a labor of love brought to you by the dedicated Faculty Incubator alumni. On behalf of all the editors of both editions, we are very proud of all our Faculty Incubator alumni who made this happen. 

Their amazing contributions have been compiled in these FREE, peer-reviewed eBooks. We sincerely feel that these will be a useful resource for all the educators out there, wrestling with the issue of integrating theory into practice. Special shout-out to the incredible Dr. Jonathan Sherbino (Volume 4) and Dr. William Bynum (Volume 5) who authored the forewords and provided us with their thoughtful insights on how theory can relate to a clinician educator’s practice.  


Education Theory Made Practical volume 4 ETMP

Brought to you by the ALiEM Faculty Incubator Class of 2019-20

How to Cite This Book
Krzyzaniak, Messman, Robinson, Schnapp, Li-Sauerwine, Gottlieb, Chan (Eds). Education Theory Made Practical, Volume 4. McMaster Office of Continuing Professional Development, Hamilton, ON, Canada. ISBN: 978-1-927565-46-9 Available at: https://books.macpfd.ca/etmp-vol4/


Brought to you by the ALiEM Faculty Incubator Class of 2020-21

How to Cite This Book
Fant, Gottlieb, Li-Sauerwine, Krzyzaniak, Natesan, Schnapp, Chan (Eds). Education Theory Made Practical, Volume 5. McMaster Office of Continuing Professional Development, Hamilton, ON, Canada. ISBN: 978-1-927565-47-6Available at: https://books.macpfd.ca/etmp-vol5/


About the Books

The Education Theory Made Practical series aims to make the theoretical underpinnings of education psychology come alive for health professions teachers who are seeking to use theory to inform their clinical and classroom teaching.

Notes from Dr. Sara Krzyzaniak, the lead editor of Volume 4: I am proud of the authors’ work in writing primers on some of the core theories in medical education. The theories covered in this volume will help educators design (Cognitive Load Theory) and evaluate (Miller’s Pyramid) their curriculum. It will help us understand why our learners behave in a certain way (Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs) and how we approach and organize abstract concepts in education (Prototype Theory). Check out the 10 chapters in Volume 4 to help you understand how we can use education theory to be more successful educators, learners, and scholars. 

Notes from Dr. Abra Fant, the lead editor of Volume 5: This volume explores 10 new theories which again cover the educational design process from start to finish. The IDEO Design Theory helps educators disrupt while designing, R2C2 provides an exceptional model for delivering feedback and the Logic Model is a wonderful resource for evaluating curricula. We invite you to explore these and other chapters to help provide background and context as you design, enact and evaluate your educational interventions. 

Our Process

As part of the Faculty Incubator program, a 2 -3 person team authored a primer on a key education theory on the International Clinician Educator (ICE) blog. These posts were published serially over a 10-week period. Each post featured a key educationally-relevant theory by starting with a vignette that situated the theory. Following this vignette, there was an explanation and short history of the theory followed by an annotated bibliography for further reading. To ensure high quality, we then asked the #MedEd and #FOAMed online communities to join us in peer-reviewing these posts. After incorporating many of the peer review comments, each blog post was converted into a book chapter within this volume of a series of books for budding clinician-educators – the Education Theory Made Practical series. We believe this will serve as a valuable tool on how to incorporate educational theory into the clinical realm in a practical way.

Teresa Chan, MD, MHPE
ALiEM Associate Editor
Emergency Physician, Hamilton
Associate Professor, McMaster University
Assistant Dean, Program for Faculty Development, McMaster University Ontario, Canada
Teresa Chan, MD, MHPE

@TChanMD

ERDoc. #meded #FOAMed Own views expressed. Contributor to @ALiEMteam, @WeAreCanadiEM, ICE Blog, #FeminEM. @MedEdLIFE founder. Works @McMasterU & @HamHealthSci
Sara M. Krzyzaniak, MD, FACEP

Sara M. Krzyzaniak, MD, FACEP

ALiEM Faculty Incubator
Chief Operating Officer
Program Director, Emergency Medicine Residency
Stanford University
Sara M. Krzyzaniak, MD, FACEP

@SMKrzyz

@StanfordEMED PD Enjoying the best job in the world: EM physician + educator for amazing learners
Michael Gottlieb, MD, RDMS

Michael Gottlieb, MD, RDMS

Emergency Ultrasound Director
Rush University Medical Center
Chief Academic Officer
ALiEM Faculty Incubator
Michael Gottlieb, MD, RDMS

@MGottliebMD

Emergency Ultrasound Director @RushEmergency, #FOAMed enthusiast, interested in #POCUS #FOAMus #MedEd. Social Media Editor @AcademicEmerMed.
Sreeja Natesan, MD

Sreeja Natesan, MD

Editor-in-Chief, ALiEM EM Bound Newsletter
Assistant Residency Program Director
Assistant Professor, Duke University
Sreeja Natesan, MD

@sreeja_natesan

Associate Program Director | MedEd, DEI, Feedback, Board Prep enthusiast | Life-long learner | #MedEd #MedTwitter #postitpearls #foamed (opinions are my own)
Abra Fant, MD

Abra Fant, MD

Assistant Residency Director
Department of Emergency Medicine
Northwestern University
Director of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement
McGraw Medical Center of Northwestern University
Abra Fant, MD

@DrAbracadabra

Emergency Medicine Physician, Residency Director Northwestern EM, passionate about QI, tweets are my own views