13 05, 2017

I am Dr. Michael Ritchie, EM/ICU Attending: How I Stay Healthy in EM

2017-05-12T11:45:50+00:00

Dr. Michael Ritchie is an emergency and ICU physician from Brooklyn, NY. When he is not busy working in the emergency department or ICU, Dr. Ritchie, can be found training for marathons, or keeping fit by keeping up his ball game. Ever wonder how to occupy your time on those long subway rides, he’s got some tips for you! Here’s how he stays healthy in EM!

 

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12 05, 2017

MEdIC Series: Case of the Solo Senior – Expert Review and Curated Community Commentary

2017-05-12T03:43:36+00:00

The Case of the Solo Senior outlined a scenario of an emergency attending who questioned the common consultant call-etiquette of not activating back-up call, whether that be another resident or the attending physician, on a busy call shift when the “solo senior” is obviously overwhelmed. This month, the MEdIC team (Tamara McColl, Teresa Chan, Sarah Luckett-Gatopoulos, Eve Purdy, John Eicken, Alkarim Velji, and Brent Thoma), hosted a discussion around this case with insights from the ALiEM community. We are proud to present to you the curated community commentary and our expert opinions. Thank-you to all participants for contributing to the very rich discussions surrounding this case!

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10 05, 2017

Wellness and Resiliency during Residency: EM is a career with unresolved stories

2017-05-22T14:16:43+00:00

“We do make a difference, but not just in the setting of resuscitating critically ill or injured people, but in putting people on the pathway to health. We often get cheated out of the ending of the movie. We don’t see the romantic side of what we’ve helped facilitate. We certainly don’t get credit for it.” – Dr. Richard Cantor

wellness and resiliency think tankThere are lots of reasons why Emergency Medicine (EM) has one of the highest burnout rates compared to other medical specialties.1,2 We have long and erratic hours, difficult patients, and an increasing number of bureaucratic tasks such as clicking boxes in an electronic medical records system or ensuring high patient-satisfaction survey responses.2 These stresses are not unique to EM, but our high-volume and high-acuity patient loads do amplify those stresses compared to other fields.

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8 05, 2017

PEM Pearls: Search & Rescue of Ear Foreign Bodies – Picking the Right Tool

2017-05-11T00:34:08+00:00

baby otoscope ear foreign bodiesWhile ear foreign bodies can happen at any age, the majority occur in children less than 7 years of age.1 The younger the patient, the less likely they are cooperative with the exam and, therefore, the less chance of successful foreign body removal. The first attempt at removal is the best, so it is important to make it count. Similarly, different types of foreign bodies call for different “tools” for removal. It is important to understand when to attempt removal in the emergency department (ED) and what tools are available. This blog post will help you optimize your first pass success at foreign body removal by understanding what tools are at your disposal.

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6 05, 2017

I am Dr. Michael Schick, Co-Director of Technology Enabled Active Learning: How I Stay Healthy in EM

2017-05-11T00:34:42+00:00

Dr. Michael Schick is an emergency physician from the University of California. Dr. Schick keeps well by maintaining resiliency and always trying to find that fine balance. When he is not busy in the department, he can be found staying active or spending time with his family. Here’s how he stays healthy in EM!

 

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4 05, 2017

2016-17 Faculty Incubator Year End Report: An incredible inaugural year

2017-05-04T18:43:54+00:00

faculty incubator year end reportIn 2016, we launched a little experiment in faculty development with an elite group of junior and mid-career faculty members from North and South America. Twelve months later, we are happy to report that we all survived… and thrived! It’s been one heck of a year! Read about what we did in our 2016-17 Faculty Incubator Year End Report.
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1 05, 2017

ACMT Toxicology Visual Pearls: Exotic Viper Envenomation

2017-04-30T14:04:03+00:00

exotic snake envenomation

A man was bitten twice on the dorsal radial aspect of his right hand while feeding his pet West African Bush Viper. The patient immediately tied multiple tourniquets around his right arm before presenting to the emergency department. During examination he is complaining of swelling and severe pain in his right upper extremity, but has no other complaints. What are the appropriate next steps in managing this patient?

  1. Apply ice to the bites
  2. Measure compartment pressures in the right arm and forearm
  3. Perform a fasciotomy
  4. Remove the tourniquets and order hematologic studies
  5. Use a venom extractor to reduce venom burden

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