Hot off the press: Review of EM Clerkship Primer book

By |Nov 20, 2009|Categories: Medical Education|0 Comments

In an upcoming issue of the Academic Emergency Medicine journal, there is a glowing review of a collaborative project that I was involved in. If you are a medical student about to do an EM rotation, or serve as a faculty advisor for an EM medical student, feel free to distribute this EM Clerkship Primer (FREE book!) for them to read. [Update 11/21/13: New link for free download PDF] This was the first official project to come out of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM). It was written by 22 established medical educators in EM, led by our fearless [+]

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Trick of the Trade: The defensive arts against pimping

By |Nov 18, 2009|Categories: Medical Education, Tricks of the Trade|Tags: , |4 Comments

Thanks to Dr. Rob Roger’s podcast on EM-RAP Educator’s Edition series, I learned of one of the funniest publications EVER in a medical journal. It was published on April 1, 2009 in JAMA. The article focuses on teaching medical students the essential skill set– how to survive “pimping”. Pimping traditionally occurs when an attending physician poses a difficult question to a learner in a public forum, such as board rounds or in the operating room. As a student or resident, you know that this will happen during your training, and you should be prepared. If you think of pimping as [+]

Article Review: Learning assessment using virtual patients

By |Nov 16, 2009|Categories: Education Articles, Medical Education|0 Comments

I am developing a new microsimulation module to help EM clerkship students gain a more realistic exposure to high-acuity patients. Emergent conditions, such as ectopic pregnancy, acute tricyclic overdose, and ST elevation MI, are usually cared for by senior residents and attendings. Rarely are students primarily involved in these cases. [+]

Article review: How do you assess the quality of educational research articles?

By |Nov 9, 2009|Categories: Education Articles, Medical Education|0 Comments

Imagine this. You are about to conduct an innovative educational project and want to get a research publication out of it. What are considered strong methodological qualities of an educational research study? What can you do to improve your chances for publication?The authors in this study developed and use an instrument to help measure the methodological quality of quantitative studies in medical education. This instrument, the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI), was used to show that scores were predictive of manuscript acceptance into the 2008 Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM) special issue on medical education.What is the [+]

Article review: Bedside teaching in the ED

By |Oct 26, 2009|Categories: Education Articles, Medical Education|0 Comments

Bedside teaching is a unique educational skill, which academic faculty are often assumed to just know how to do. In the ED, it is especially difficult to do this well, because of crowding and unexpected time-sensitive clinical issues, which create distractions and general chaos. Experientially, unpredictable clinical issues negatively impact bedside teaching. Thus, faculty should be flexible and knowledgeable of basic bedside teaching tenets. [+]

Article review: Handoffs in the Emergency Department

By |Oct 19, 2009|Categories: Education Articles, Medical Education|4 Comments

One shared experience amongst all emergency physicians is the “handoff” or “signout” of patients at the end of your shift to the oncoming physician. A recent article in Annals of Emergency Medicine explores and explains how this process can often lead to delays and errors in patient management. Just envision ED handoffs as a high-stakes game of Telephone, which you played as a child. [+]

Article review: Optimal training during fourth year of medical school

By |Oct 12, 2009|Categories: Education Articles, Medical Education|Tags: |0 Comments

U.S. medical students traditionally spend the first 3 years of training in a pre-determined curriculum. In their 4th year, however, students have significant flexibility in how they tailor their time. For this last year before residency, they shift from a learner-centered curriculum to a patient-centered curriculum. There is a shift in mentality from “I am here to learn as much as I can about medicine” to more of a “How do I best prepare myself for working in a hospital in my chosen specialty?” [+]

Hot off the press: Improving medical student presentations in the ED

By |Oct 9, 2009|Categories: Education Articles, Medical Education|Tags: |0 Comments

Website: www.emrapee.com The EM-RAP Educator’s Edition podcast just released its 6th podcast episode. Dr. Rob Rogers et al discuss practical tips and approaches to giving feedback on medical student presentations. Presentations in the ED are very different from those in other specialties, such as internal medicine and surgery. The discussants dissect and comment on parts of the presentation. [+]

What is a journal "impact factor"?

By |Aug 20, 2009|Categories: Academic|0 Comments

Journals use the numerical "Impact Factor" as an indirect quantitative measure of a journal's importance in the medical field and scientific literature. Thompson Scientific calculates the impact factor scores annually. This score provides journals with bragging rights, especially when it comes to marketing. Be aware that there are ways to manipulate the numbers a little and thus brings the true value of this score into question. How is the impact factor calculated? The impact factor is a calculation of how frequent a journal's articles are cited in a 2-year period. As an example, the 2009 impact factor for a journal [+]

Educator’s portfolio

By |Aug 13, 2009|Categories: Medical Education|1 Comment

Are you a medical educator and can’t quite illustrate the importance and impact of your work in your CV? I’ve always had this problem when compiling and updating my CV. The traditional CV format caters especially to academic physicians who are active in public service, traditional research, and leadership positions. What about the great procedural course that you ran with stellar evaluations? What about the lecture you gave at a national conference? [+]