Crowdsourcing all of your burning questions about EM

AskTheAudience

Have you noticed that on “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire”, asking the audience as a lifeline almost always results in the right answer (over 90% of the time)?

Dr. David Thorisson (Lund University, Scandinavia) recently approached me with a novel idea of doing the same for Emergency Medicine questions. These questions are currently posted to a public Google Docs document, which allows anyone to post and answer questions.

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By |2016-11-11T18:51:44-08:00Nov 21, 2011|Medical Education, Social Media & Tech|

Video: Dr. Eric Mazur on peer teaching

“My lecturing was ineffective, despite the high evaluations.”
“The traditional approach to teaching reduces education to a transfer of information.”
– Dr. Eric Mazur

Dr. Eric Mazur is a Harvard Professor of Physics and Applied Physics who talks about his “confessions of a converted lecturer”. He focuses on the power of peer teaching and the ineffectiveness of the traditional lecture format in a classroom.

This talk is 72 minutes long. Take some time to listen and learn. Dr. Mazur is such an engaging talk that I couldn’t stop watching. Maybe it’s because he looks a little like the comedian Steve Carell.

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By |2019-01-28T22:35:07-08:00Nov 14, 2011|Medical Education|

Article review: Evaluating your written evaluation of a learner

EvaluationChecklist3dAs a new faculty, one of the first challenges that I encountered was completing evaluation forms for medical students and residents. In our department, a Daily Evaluation Card (DEC) is to be completed at the end of every shift for each learner. These DEC’s are then collated by the program directors to yield a summative final rotation evaluation.

What I wondered was: how can I best use these DEC’s to help learners progress as medical professionals and at the same time provide critical information for the PD’s?

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By |2016-11-15T22:24:53-08:00Nov 7, 2011|Education Articles, Medical Education|

G-Advising: Using Google Hangout to advise medical students

GoogleHangout102411
Get an advisor.

Don’t try to navigate medical school and residency on your own.

This is key especially during medical school as you try to get through and around the mounds of reading, paperwork, options, and pitfalls. If you are interested in Emergency Medicine (EM) as a career, that means getting one or several great EM advisors. Don’t rely on non-EM faculty to give you any insight into EM. Inevitably, I have found that they give incomplete or slightly skewed perspectives about the pros and cons of EM.

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By |2016-11-11T18:51:55-08:00Oct 26, 2011|Medical Education, Social Media & Tech|

Remembering Dr. Robert Buckman

Screen shot 2011-10-12 at 4.27.10 PM

For those who trained in Canada (especially Toronto), the name of Dr. Robert Buckman always brought a chuckle. He filled his lectures with his signature British wit and humour. Yet, the message was always loud and clear. Being an oncologist, he had great insight in communication with patients.

He was the first to teach us medical students about communication and professionalism: Kindness, empathy, delivering bad news, what to say when you don’t know what to say. A decade later, out of the countless hours of lectures, his stood out.

Truly a big loss to the medical educators community.

By |2016-11-11T18:51:56-08:00Oct 13, 2011|Medical Education|

Poll: YOU are on the residency selection committee. What would YOU do?

Rave

As an attending physician, you are friends with nurses and residents on social media.

One day, you are browsing through your social media page. You came across a photo of a student – a candidate applying to your program in fact – scantily clad, inebriated, dancing in a rave. The comments followed agreed on how wild he/she had partied and drank that night.

You are on the selection committee. Should this information be part of the assessment of the candidate?

 Please explain your decision in the comments section.
By |2016-11-11T18:51:57-08:00Oct 3, 2011|Medical Education|