School Sucks: Building a new culture of teaching and learning

SchoolSucks

In his talk (subtitled “School Sucks”), Northwestern University Physics Professor Dr. Tae describes how he would improve math and science education. While this is directed at college studies, some of the concepts are applicable to teaching Emergency Medicine.

He shares a lot of great insight, but I wanted to focus on one concept in particular:

The secret to learning = “Work your ass off until you figure it out.” 

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2019-02-19T18:08:09-08:00

Article Review: Online curriculum for non-EM residents in the ED

OnlineCurrIn many academic Emergency Departments, there are “off-service” or non-EM residents rotating in the department. They are sometimes invited to the EM residency conference series for the month. Often times though, they have too many departmental didactic events and obligations of their own that they don’t have time to attend formal EM didactics.

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2016-11-11T19:00:11-08:00

VIPER video: How to give effective feedback

web-video-iconA few years ago, Dr. Esther Choo and I created a fun 15-minute instructional video on called Giving Effective Feedback: Beyond “Great Job”. We had a blast recording sample feedback scenarios with our faculty and medical students. For every 1 minute of published footage, there were at least 9 minutes of bloopers and laughter! We definitely should keep our day job.

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2016-11-11T19:00:12-08:00

Article review: Academic professional bankruptcy


Bankrupt
In academia, faculty are expected to do it all– clinical care, bedside teaching, formal didactics, scholarly work, and administrative projects. Asking for protected time, or release time from clinical work, from your department chair is often a difficult negotiation process, especially for junior faculty.

Fresh out of residency and fellowship training, junior faculty are just excited to get started as an academic faculty member. A downpour of exciting opportunities descends upon you, and you just can’t say no to them! A year later passes, and you realize that you are overwhelmed.

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2016-11-11T19:00:13-08:00

Diagnoses that sound alike

Emergency Medicine is as much about taking care of undifferentiated patients as it is about naming specific signs, symptoms and diagnoses. After 10 years of medical training I’ve noticed that there are a few diseases that require us to stop and think a bit. In particular I’m thinking about conditions that share these features:

  1. They sound-alike, look-alike, or share words or roots of words
  2. They affect a specific organ or part of the body
  3. They have very different etiologies, implications, prognosis and treatment

The two sets of diagnoses that I encounter most frequently with this problem are Mesenteric Ischemia (or Ischemic Bowel) and Ischemic Colitis and Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysm (often manifested in the unlikely “dissecting aneurysm”).
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2017-11-06T18:51:53-08:00

Trick of the Trade: Self-Reflection

Selfreflection

After a shift, we often review the day’s case with our learners. We sometimes ask them to self-reflect.

I often used Demian’s ‘Plus/Delta’ approach and ask ‘What did you like /what would you change?’

This approach works well mostly. But, when the answer is ‘I don’t think I would change anything’, it is hard to target teaching and feedback to the learner’s need.

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2016-11-11T19:00:17-08:00