Simulation Trick of the Trade: Bleeding Cricothyroidotomy Model

One advantage of simulation as an educational tool is the re-creation of cognitive and emotional stresses in caring for patients. Doing this for a high fidelity scenario is relatively easy – add additional patients, make a them loud, combative, or otherwise cantankerous, and add interruptions for good measure. However, when training for procedures in the simulation lab, we practice the procedure in isolation on a “task trainer” without cognitive and emotional stress for context. An off-the-shelf task trainer can do a superb job of teaching the mechanics of performing a procedure, but they lack complexity necessary to train for performing the procedure under stress. (more…)

2016-11-11T19:21:07-07:00

Trick of the Trade: Nail Bed Repair With Tissue Adhesive Glue

Nail Bed Repair

Patients with fingertip injuries involving the nail bed typically present to the emergency department and require meticulous repair of the nail bed to prevent long-term cosmetic and functional disability. There are several methods to repair nail beds, typically involving absorbable suture, but maybe there is a faster way with similar cosmetic and functional outcomes. 

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2019-02-05T07:21:10-07:00

Trick of the Trade: Making your own homemade ultrasound gel

UltrasoundKenyaYou are spending a month in rural Kenya, doing an ultrasound teaching course. Your enthusiastic participants have been ultrasounding every chance they get. Unfortunately, this has caused your ultrasound gel supplies to dwindle. It will be a month before a new shipment of gel arrives from Nairobi. This gel will cost about $5 per bottle, which is a considerable expense for the local hospital’s budget.

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Trick of the Trade: Nasal foreign body removal using foley catheter

 

 

A healthy 4 year-old boy is brought in by mom for a plastic bead up his nose. The mom states, “The last time the other doctors had to be called, and it took forever. Oh, and I have to pick up his brother from school in 30 minutes. Can you get it out, doc?” The patient is squirming even as you take a quick peek at his nose, but you catch a glimmer of the bead up his right nare.

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2016-11-15T22:07:21-07:00

Trick of the Trade: Parting the hair for scalp laceration repair

scalp laceration 1Trying to suture or staple a scalp laceration is oftentimes a hairy proposition for emergency physicians who repair these types of wounds regularly. Although the “hair apposition technique” method is one option, if one opts for sutures or staples, the most difficult part of the procedure is trying to avoid trapping hair strands within the wound, which may cause wound dehiscense, a foreign body reaction, or a local infection. 

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2016-11-11T19:19:43-07:00

Trick of the Trade: Nasopharyngeal Oxygenation

DesaturationA 76-year-old obese male with a history of severe COPD presents to your emergency department (ED) in acute respiratory distress. The patient’s large beard prevents an adequate seal with the NIV (non-invasive ventilation) mask, and the patient continues to desaturate. You are fairly sure that this patient will be a difficult airway and optimizing oxygenation prior to and during your intubation attempt would be ideal. Now what?

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2016-11-11T19:19:38-07:00

Trick of the Trade: Fist Bump to Reduce Pathogen Transmission

Fist BumpHandshaking has been practiced as far back as the 5th century BC and used today as a common way of greeting others. In the hospital setting this occurs multiple times throughout the day. Many alternatives to the handshake have been developed and utilized, but they have failed to replace the handshake as a form of greeting. Nosocomial infections have been identified as a major preventable complication of inpatient care and one of the most important initiatives to reduce this is hand hygiene. The authors of this study propose the fist bump as a safe and effective way to avoid hand-to-hand contact and therefore reduce transmission of infection. 1 (more…)

2016-11-11T19:19:34-07:00